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K.I.D.S./ Fashion Delivers Review

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers Press Placements

With a novel approach to experiential packaging, Kidbox’s development has been geared around the interaction between the brand and its end users – parents and kids alike. Brittany Golob explores the brand

A kid gets a box in the post. It has a colourful logo on it, and black-and- white outlines. When the kid opens the box, it not only contains a season’s worth of new clothes, but a pencil case, crayons, stickers and a surprise toy. When the kid looks at the box, it’s apparent that the outlined images are meant to be coloured in and stickered and enjoyed.

That’s the experience Kidbox has designed. For the delivery box service, it’s not just about the savings parents can achieve on kids’ clothes, it’s about a joint experience for parent and kid alike. That experience, from website to service to logo to delivery and beyond, has been carefully crafted by the New York team of Base Design.

The brand agency worked with the startup – run by founder Haim Dabah and CEO Miki Berardelli – nearly from its inception in August last year. For six months, Base worked through the development of the brand and brand experience. Dabah is the man behind Gitano – a jeans brand that was sold to Fruit of the Loom – and was executive director of Li & Fung USA, now called Global Brands Group, which manages the likes of Juicy Couture, Frye and Spyder. His latest foray into fashion with Kidbox is designed to change the shopping experience for children’s clothes.

Berardelli says, “At every touchpoint, we communicate our key pillars of brand, value, convenience, fun, time together and giving back. We also listen closely to our customer and make sure she and her children are at the center of every decision we make about the business and the shopping experience.”

There are a number of subscription boxes that focus on kids clothes, particularly in the US. However, only one other, Kidpix, includes any kind of activities and all of Kidbox’s competitors come in plain brown cardboard boxes or plastic shipping bags. The basic format is similar across brands, parents can enter the kid’s details including age, weight and style preferences. They then get sent a box with a number of items, occasionally at

a discounted rate, and can then return, exchange or keep them. To differentiate itself among those compatriots, Kidbox had to look different, but it also had to have added value.

Geoff Cook, founding partner of Base Design New York, says his team worked to avoid the design clichés often used by brands geared toward children. “Most childrenswear companies use the same visual cues,” he says. “The language tends to be kind of cute and a little playful in a childish way.” For Kidbox, the branding was designed to appeal to children and their parents. It’s still colourful and playful, but with the added maturity that the Roy Lichtenstein-inspired brand brings. The logo is comprised of blocky, all-caps letters with crayon-like colour shades and different patterns and textures. Like Lichtenstein’s work, which is recognisable due to its consistent style, the Kidbox brand is not only unique, but it is flexible. The textured approach allows the brand to expand and grow as well as ensure that its brand touchpoints are instantly recognisable.

On the Kibox website, patterns are used across different graphics of kids clothes, they bring an animation about how Kidbox works to life, they inform the way the buttons on the site look and they allow a starting point for the company’s social media communications.

“We wanted the brand’s personality to be as strong as the functional aspect of shopping,” Cook says. “As you go through the site, you do feel that brand presence throughout.”

The website also features photography commissioned by Base that focus on the experience of the brand, from wearing the clothes to opening the box. As parents go through the site, the photography highlights the different styles and characteristics that they can select to represent their child. For the parent, the brand experience is primarily a digital one. Once they submit their kid’s preferences, the next interaction they may have with Kidbox is in returning or exchanging clothes they receive.

For the kid, however, the experience is primarily a physical one. And it’s all about the box. Berardelli says, “Unpacking a Kidbox is fun for the child and taps into their sense of play with sensory stimulation through color, materials, our branded box, crayons, stickers and a surprise gift. We are also hearing from our customers that because of the Kidbox shopping experience, parents are having conversations with their children about the importance of giving back much sooner in their life than would have happened otherwise. We find that extremely powerful.”

New clothes are exciting, but every other children’s clothing box delivers new clothes. Kidbox adds value through experience. Each box has the colourful logo splayed across the sides, but the top and inside of the box are white, with minimal black outlined drawings to encourage colouring. The box comes with stickers, a pencil case and a toy. “Opening the box was so much fun for my son,” one online reviewer writes. “The box itself has designs inside and is meant to be coloured. All these extras were a lot of fun!”

Cook says the element of surprise upon receiving and opening the Kidbox is the primary difference in the brand. It is meant to be interactive, he says. And, Base ensured the brand would avoid the more traditional ways of branding for kids including making things blue for boys or pink for girls. “We purposefully created the Kidbox language to be agnostic. It’s meant to appeal to any child,” he says.

The boxes, which are sent five times a year, come in either a 30cm x 30cm x 10cm size or a larger 40cm x 30cm x 10cm, giving crayon-armed kids more opportunities for creativity.

Cook says the experience is geared toward the reaction of both kids and parents upon opening a Kidbox. “We want parents and kids alike to feel joy when they open the box. The mother or father opens the box with the child and they’re getting these great clothes that are appropriate for their child. We’ve made the box interactive. That’s very new and very unusual for any company to think of its packaging in an interactive way that brings families together,” Cook says.

For parents, the experience continues one step further because, if a parent keeps all the items in the box, they receive a discounted rate, and an item of new clothing is donated to a child in need. This allows parents to educate their children about charitable giving. Families can choose where the donation will be made – via charity K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers.

The brand development and unique approach to experiential packaging has paid off. In Kidbox’s first year of operation, its customer acquisition costs were 60% less than expected. The brand experience is not static either. Berardelli says there are plans to expand the brands and services on offer. Kidbox also has a new mobile app that will allow for a more customisable experience. The goal, she says, is to ensure the best possible personalised and relevant experience to parents and kids alike.

http://www.transformmagazine.net/articles/2017/brand-experience-kidbox/

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There are 15 million children living in poverty in the U.S. lacking basic necessities like food, clothes and diapers; but also deprived of important play opportunities that help foster critical emotional, physical and cognitive development. Studies have shown, kids who live below the poverty line are more likely to experience delays in brain development, enabling play at an early age enhances the progress of development from 33% to 67%*.

Since 1985, Toys“R”Us has continually strived to combat the harsh realities faced by impoverished families through its partnership with K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, a nonprofit organization that connects retailers (as well as manufacturers, foundations and individuals) with local nonprofit agencies. Over the past 30 years, the company has donated more than $100 million in books, toys, clothes, diapers, bottles, food (and more) from its 885 Toys“R”Us and Babies“R”Us stores in the U.S., distribution centers and corporate office to community-based charities across the country, providing them with items needed to help keep children safe and healthy.

– See more at: https://www.toysrusinc.com/press/exploring-our-partnership-with-kids#sthash.WXxloaDT.dpuf

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PLAINFIELD, NJ – Plainfield Public Schools’ Plainfield Academy for the Arts and Advanced Studies (PAAAS) had been selected as the recipient of the 10th Annual Burlington Coat Factory, KIDS Fashion Delivers and Good Morning America’s “Warm Coats and Warm Hearts” coat drive.

On Jan. 19th, the coats were distributed, with over 100 new coats donated to students from Plainfield and their families. The coats were made possible as a gift from Danielle Biondi, 12, who won a “Good Morning America” national art contest to decorate the coat donation bins. 

Biondi, whose mom works in the school district, selected Plainfield to receive the coats.  It was her idea to give the donated coats to families in Plainfield where the need is greater than in her community of Hillsborough, NJ.

RELATED:  Plainfield Public Schools – PAAAS recipient of Warm Coats and Warm Hearts Coat Drive by ABC’s Good Morning America, Burlington Coat Factory and Kids Fashion Delivers

CLEVELAND HEIGHTS, Ohio — One local organization is helping make sure people stay warm this winter.

The non-profit organization, Giving Life Foundation, passed out about 80 coats Thursday afternoon in Cleveland Heights. Those who attended the event also got dinner and a few other gifts.

“We want to try and help as many people as possible have a wonderful holiday. We have about 300 more coats to give away,” said Renina Black, President of the Giving Life Foundation.

Giving Life Foundation works in partnership with Burlington Coat Factory, Toys for Tots, and K.I.D.S. Fashion Delivers.

“We have also had people who have extra coats donate to us as well,” Black said.

Anyone who is in need of a coat should call 216-282-7153.

Fox8.com/2016/12/22/helping-others-80-coats-handed-out-to-keep-people-warm-this-winter/

ATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) –

The Red Stick Retail Shop will be open until December 17 to provide those recovering from the flood with new clothing for children. 

MORE

2016 Historic Flooding

“It’s a really good experience, especially if you have been affected by the flood and if you don’t have any clothes for your kids,” said Asia Raby with Urban League Red Stick, during the last opening of the shop.

The Red Stick Retail Shop is exclusively for flood victims and it has opened several times since August, providing clothing for anyone affected. The charity store reopened December 12 to provide kids clothing for Christmas.

The store is located in Cortana Mall and is open from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m.

The clothing are available in the following age groups: 

3 months

6 months

9 months

12 months

24 months

2T 3T 4T 5T

5, 6 and 7

The additional items available include: 

Strollers

Kids pillows (Olaf)

100 play pens

Bobs

Anyone who suffered from flood damage is welcome to go to the shop, but must have a FEMA letter (approved or denied) and some form of photo identification.  

The merchandise is being provided by K.I.D.S/Fashion Delivers, a national charity.

This will be the fifth time the store has opened its doors to flood victims. The first event was by appointment only and served about 1,000 families. 

http://www.ksla.com/story/34051672/flood-recovery-red-stick-retail-shop-now-offering-clothing-for-kids

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http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video/denver-nuggets-star-donates-300-coats-coat-drive-44179299

BATON ROUGE (WGNO) – Victims of the severe flooding that swept across south Louisiana in early August can shop for free at the Cortana Mall from October 27-30.

The Red Stick Retail Shop, presented by State Representative Ted James and the Urban League, is open to anyone that was displaced by the historic flooding and has a letter from the Federal Emergency Management Agency proving it.

Qualified shoppers will be able to pick up clothes, bedding, toys, household items, and more that have been donated by brands including Ralph Lauren, Free People, and Sketchers.

Rep. James, a Democrat who represents East Baton Rouge Parish, partnered with the Urban League of Louisiana for the program, which has had an overwhelming response so far, according to the Urban League’s website.

Kids Fashion Delivers, the Baton Rouge Area Foundation, and the Louisiana Workforce Commission are also partners for the event.

http://wgno.com/2016/10/26/red-stick-retail-shop-offers-free-supplies-to-baton-rouge-flooding-victims/

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

H&M’s Buy Home, Give Home campaign, launching today, will allow customers to give back with home purchases made at U.S. H&M locations carrying the line and through hm.com. For every H&M Home item purchased between August 4th and August 18th, the retailer will donate an item to families in need, up to $165,000 worth of household product. The donation is made to H&M’s non-profit partner K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, a charity that provides new merchandise to at-risk children, families, and individuals through a network of 1000+ U.S. community partners, offering hope, dignity and self-esteem.

This Smart News Release features multimedia. View the full release here: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160804005295/en/

“Families in need have limited budgets that usually must be spent on essential items like food, rent or clothes. These donated items will allow them to add some touches of flair and personality to their homes, without having to choose between daily needs and a little comforting style,” says Lisa Gurwitch, President and CEO of K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers.

Key home items in-store and online now include great décor essentials that are perfect for the dorm and beyond! Bedding available includes various colors of fitted sheets for single and double beds in 100% cotton or linen and velvet cushion covers. Woven cotton body and hand towel sets make for soft bathroom necessities and decorative items such as picture frames, mirrors, rugs, and storage items are cozy finishing touches to any living space. The collection ranges in price from $5.99 to $79.99.

In conjunction with the campaign, H&M will be offering a 20% in-store student discount on all home items with the presentation of a valid student ID card. Additional details on the Buy Home, Give Home campaign can be found at www.hm.com/us/.

Anyone wishing to help with cash donations to K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers can do so online at www.DonateProduct.com/HMgivesback.

Download additional images here.

H & M Hennes & Mauritz AB (publ) was founded in Sweden in 1947 and is quoted on Nasdaq Stockholm. H&M’s business concept is to offer fashion and quality at the best price in a sustainable way. In addition to H&M, the group includes the brands & Other Stories, Cheap Monday, COS, Monki and Weekday as well as H&M Home. The H&M Group has approximately 3,600 stores in 59 markets, including franchise markets. In 2014, sales including VAT were SEK 176,620 million and the number of employees is more than 132,000. For further information, visit hm.com.

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc. is the charity of choice for new product donations made by hundreds of companies in the fashion, home and children’s industries. Donating new merchandise provides these companies with a simple and effective way to help people in need. Founded over 30 years ago, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that unites retailers, manufacturers, foundations and individuals to support people affected by poverty and tragedy. K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is an extremely efficient charity, with more than 97% of revenue dedicated to its charitable program of distributing apparel, accessories, shoes, home furnishings, toys, books and other useful items. Since 1985, over $1.4 billion of donated products have been distributed through our network of community partners, serving the poor and disadvantaged worldwide.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/h-m-debuts-buy-home-130000302.html

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During their five-year partnership, children and family-focused charity K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers Inc. and casual-footwear maker Skechers USA Inc. have distributed a lot of shoes — 7.5 million pairs, to be exact.

Since forging the relationship in 2011, Skechers has donated millions of its Bobs footwear line to the organization. And 30-year-old K.I.D.S/Fashion Delivers said it has turned around and distributed those shoes to more than 180 nonprofit community organizations domestically and internationally.

RELATED Retailers & Experts Tackle The Tough Questions On This Back-To-School Season

New shoes from Bobs from Skechers fulfill a critical need in the lives of the children who receive them,” said Lisa Gurwitch, president and CEO of K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers. “With over 1 million new pairs of Bobs from Skechers shoes distributed each year, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers and Skechers are able to give the gift of hope, self-esteem to all who receive them.”

Philanthropy has been a top priority for Manhattan Beach, Calif.-based Skechers for some time, according to company president Michael Greenberg. Specifically, the Bobs line has been a major catalyst for the brand’s charitable initiatives.

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers events in Covington, Ky., and Philadelphia.

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers.

Through our Bobs from Skechers charitable program, we’ve donated more than 13 million pairs of new shoes to children in need in the United States and around the world,” Greenberg said. “This achievement is of course due to the success of the Bobs from Skechers shoe line, working with our key accounts to create some impactful donation events, and the movement of the shoes to the many different charities through K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers.”

He added, “Their extensive charity network has helped us reach kids struggling with poverty, homelessness and natural disasters. I was honored to be at one of the first donation events in June of 2012, and I am pleased that this program, and the work of our many accounts and donation partners continues to provide to children in need.”

President & CEO of K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers Lisa Gurwitch at a Bobs for Skechers event in Newark, N.J.

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers.

Family-footwear retailer Shoe Carnival has also jumped on board, helping to donate Bobs from Skechers to nearly 50,000 children, according to the company.

From Pennsylvania, Kentucky and Utah to Puerto Rico, local Shoe Carnival employees have volunteered at shoe donation events within their communities, fostering relationships and impacting the lives of these children,” said Todd Beurman, SVP of marketing for Shoe Carnival. “We are delighted to partner with Skechers and K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers to donate even more shoes this year in South Dakota and Arizona.”

For more than three decades, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers has donated new products, including apparel, accessories, shoes and home furnishings, to underprivileged families. The charity’s other shoe partners include Deckers Brands, Vans and Nine West.

http://footwearnews.com/2016/business/media/skechers-kids-fashion-delivers-donates-7-million-shoes-needy-children-244000/

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is partnering with NYDJ on a charitable program tied to their store openings in Roosevelt Field Mall in Garden City, N.Y. and Scottsdale, Ariz.

NYDJ will donate a piece of apparel for each customer (up to 300 at each store) who simply tries on a pair of jeans.

The offer is called “You Try. We Give.” and will run from Thursday to July 28 at the Roosevelt Field Mall store in Garden City, N.Y. and July 28 through July 31 in Scottsdale, Ariz.

The clothing will be distributed to K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers’ community partners, Hour Children in Queens, N.Y. and Singleton Moms in Arizona.

http://wwd.com/markets-news/denim/nydj-k-i-d-s-fashion-delivers-team-up-for-clothing-drive-10493454/

Camuto Group chief creative officer Louise Camuto continues to garner attention for her philanthropy.

The wife of the late Vince Camuto, co-founder of Nine West and founder of Camuto Group, was one of three women honored Tuesday at the 10th Annual Women of Inspiration luncheon in New York.

The event is hosted by K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, a 30-year-old charity that donates new products, including apparel, accessories, shoes and home furnishings, to underprivileged families. The organization relies heavily on donations from footwear and apparel companies such as Camuto Group to help it provide relief to families — as in the case of last year’s flooding in South Carolina, where the charity donated nearly $2 million in products to those affected.

The event’s other honorees were Claudia Stern, intimate buyer for Gabriel Brothers, and Luanne Whiting-Lager, VP and CFO of Regal Lager Inc.

While accepting her honor, Camuto took an opportunity to discuss some of the challenges facing women, particularly across the U.S.

Women make enormous contributions to economies — whether in business or on farms, as entrepreneurs or employees or by doing unpaid care work at home,” Camuto said. “Yet in America, women are 35 percent more likely than men to be poor and single mothers face the highest risk.”

The creative officer said she would continue to partner with organizations such as K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers to help change those dynamics.

I think we should [live] our lives by example and try to help others as much as we can,” she said. “We can only be as strong as the work we do together.”

Camuto was also honored by the The Father’s Day/Mother’s Day charity last month as one of four “outstanding mothers” and plays a key role in Camuto Group’s involvement in several other charitable initiatives, including FFANY Shoes On Sale, which supports breast cancer research and awareness.

Other companies that have donated to K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers include Skechers, Deckers Brands, Iconix Brand Group and Sequential Brands Group.

Louise Camuto Honored By K.I.D.S/Fashion Delivers

“Women of Inspiration” was the theme of the 10th annual K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers luncheon at The Pierre Hotel, which honored three executive women Tuesday and was attended by 380 people.

Louise Camuto, chief creative officer of Camuto Group; Claudia Stern, intimate buyer for Gabriel Brothers, and Luanne Whiting-Lager, vice president, chief financial officer of Regal Lager Inc., were the three honorees at the luncheon, which was hosted by Alison Morris, Fox 5 business reporter.

For 2015, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers has raised $140 million in new product donations from 405 companies. Over $315,000 was raised at the luncheon.

As part of the event, Rachel Larratt, a South Carolina community activist, described what happened in her state last October, when it was completely flooded. “There were 20 inches of rain and people lost homes and everything they owned. Water poured into their homes and covered the neighborhood,” she said. After they boarded up homes, they were faced with the question, “Now what?” People needed socks, underwear and T-shirts and K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers donated $1.9 million in new product to help the 3,500 flood survivors get back on their feet. K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers opened up a free pop-up store in the area.

Stephen K. Benjamin, Mayor of Columbia, S.C., who attended the luncheon, thanked the charity for the help it provided the survivors and gave the charity’s co-chairmen a key to the city. “Twelve trillion gallons of water fell on the Carolinas this fall,” he said. He thanked K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers for their “wonderful support.” Throughout its 31-year history, the charity has donated $1.3 billion in merchandise to needy families. “You guys are making a huge difference in the lives of so many,” said Benjamin.

All three of the honorees described heart-warming visits to several different charities that receive much-needed support from K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers. Camuto, for example, described a visit to Bottomless Closet, which provides disadvantaged women with interview clothes. “Bottomless Closet give the women a chance to change their lives,” she said. She said that K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers “impacts real lives and people impacted by poverty.”

“Distributing foundations and sleepwear to people in need is a lovely way for our industry to give back,” said Stern, who made a trip to New Alternatives for Children, a group that helps 1,400 medically fragile children avoid foster care and institutions and keeps them at home, providing them with new apparel, books and toys.

“I’m a firm believer that giving to others heals your soul,” said Whiting-Lager, who visited Kamileon’s Kloset in Atlanta, which helps men and women seek employment and offers life coaching and workshops. At the end of the luncheon, Broadway Youth Ensemble entertained the crowd, receiving a standing ovation.

http://wwd.com/fashion-news/fashion-scoops/kids-fashion-delivers-camuto-stern-whiting-lager-10446510/

KIDBOX – Kid Fashion Delivered To Your Door
April 18, 2016 By Double Duty Mommy

Ordering clothes online and having them delivered to your door is all the rage nowadays. Why not, most are a great service that allows you to grow your closet while trying our brands and pieces you may not have found on your own. For kids, the choices have been limited and for us personally, I didn’t see a need to show for my kids like that. I like to have a say in the styles my kids wear so I could never trust a delivery service to do that for me.

Recently, Kidbox asked me to partner with them on a post and I knew this was the brand for us after reading just a few things about this amazing company. Kidbox is not your typical “clothing delivery service”. They are first kids style box that combines cool brands, meaningful savings and a mission to clothe children in need.

What makes Kidbox different? They ask you questions about your kid! So simple, right? I could not believe how detailed every page was so I was confident knowing the clothes I trusted Kidbox to send my daughter’s fit into their style and my Mama Bear rules.

They start out asking name and age, then what size top they typically wear, and what size bottoms. The next questions include what their “style” is. For Kendall we picked Modern/Fab! The following questions include “Anything We Should Avoid” and for girls they listed things like tight clothing, stripes, dots, dresses, and prints. Click on your selections then the next question asks what colors they should avoid such as neons, purple, red, ect. I love the attention to detail with these questions. Kendall is such a free spirit so we allowed Kidbox to choose from any type of clothing except tight fitting and left all the colors to choose from.

Kidbox definitely hit the nail on the end.

http://doubledutymommy.com/2016/04/kids-clothing-delivery-service.html/

RENO, Nev. (March 31, 2016) – The Reno Rodeo Foundation received a generous donation through a formal partnership with K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers. Skechers has donated 29,000 pairs of BOBS donation shoes that will be distributed to children residing throughout 14 northern Nevada counties. The Reno Rodeo Foundation and partners, including local Skechers employees, will host a distribution event at the Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center Exhibit Hall April 2, where children will receive a new pair of BOBS and have the opportunity to personalize them at hosted decorating stations.

WHEN: Saturday, April 2 at 10 a.m.

WHERE: Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center Exhibit Hall, 1350 N Wells Ave.

WHO: The Reno Rodeo Foundation in collaboration with Washoe County Social Services, Washoe County School District, Education Alliance of Washoe County, Washoe County Child Protective Services and the State of Nevada Division of Child & Family Services, as well as organizations like the Children’s Cabinet, Boys & Girls Club, Catholic Charities and Good Shepherd’s Clothes Closet will help distribute these new shoes to children in 14 northern Nevada counties.

Skechers executives and employees will also be flying into Reno to attend and help with the distribution event.

WHY: Since the BOBS from SKECHERS program launched in 2011, SKECHERS has donated more than 13 million pairs of new shoes to children in need. SKECHERS partners with Head Start programs, education foundations, homeless shelters, disaster relief, and 501(c)(3) organizations to assist children and families in communities across the United States and around the world.

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc. is the charity of choice for new product donations made by hundreds of companies in the fashion, home and children’s industries. Donating new merchandise provides these companies with a simple and effective way to help people in need. Founded 31 years ago, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that unites retailers, manufacturers, foundations and individuals to support people affected by poverty and tragedy. For more information, please visit http://www.DonateProduct.com.

Formed in 1986, the Reno Rodeo Foundation has been making a difference to children and families in northern Nevada for more than 25 years. Started as a private foundation with the sole purpose of distributing the proceeds from the annual Reno Rodeo through scholarships and community grants, the Reno Rodeo Foundation is Nevada based a 501(c)(3) public charity offering a much broader range of support to those in need in our community. The mission of the Reno Rodeo Foundation is to enhance and enrich the lives of northern Nevada families by aiding children with extraordinary needs, building community partnerships, and providing scholarships to eligible northern Nevada high-school graduates to attend a Nevada College or University.

http://wranglernetwork.com/news/reno-rodeo-foundation-skechers-shoe-distribution-event-29000-pairs-to-kids-in-need/

La empresa Sketchers y la organización Sembrando Semillas de Fondos Unidos de Puerto Rico unieron esfuerzos para regalar zapatos a mil niños y niñas de escasos recursos económicos de la región Oeste. Estos hicieron la entrega en la pista de patinaje sobre hielo de Aguadilla.

http://wole12.com/2016/02/05/ninos-del-oeste-reciben-zapatos/

RENO, Nev. – (KOLO) Volunteers with the Reno Rodeo Foundation spent Friday morning unloading 29,000 pairs of shoes.

“We have a formal partnership with K.I.D.S. which stands for kids in distressed situations,” said Clara Andriola, Executive Director of the Reno Rodeo Foundation. “They are a national organization that works with nonprofits all over the nation and they have a relationship with Sketchers.”

Friday’s distribution was for kids in foster care. But this weekend, any child between the ages of 2 and 12 is welcome to head down to the Livestock Events Center and pick up a new pair.

“What’s special about these shoes is we have paint markers and they can personalize and decorate their shoes and really create an experience of ownership,” Andriola said.

The shoes are going to kids in 14 northern Nevada counties. It’s a community effort.

“We have so many local businesses helping out; Scolari’s is actually helping transport hundreds of these shoes to Tonopah so those kids can benefit as well,” Andriola said.

The shoes will be handed out at the Reno Livestock Events Center April 2 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and April 3 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

http://www.kolotv.com/content/news/Reno-Rodeo-Foundation-to-hand-out-29000-pairs-of-shoes-374341941.html

Founded in 1985, and led by President & CEO Lisa D. Gurwitch, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc., is a nonprofit that effectively unites retailers, manufacturers, foundations and individuals to support people affected by poverty and tragedy. More than 97% of the organization’s revenue is dedicated to its charitable program of distributing apparel, accessories, shoes, home furnishings, toys, books and other useful items.

We were lucky to get to speak with the amazing organization’s Marketing Director Peter Paris, who offered us a deeper look at everything K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc., has achieved for those in need over the past 30+ years.

Q.) What K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc. does in the way of helping to fight the epidemic of poverty in this country and around the world is really remarkable. How did the original idea for the organization come to be?

In 1985, executives in the children’s product industries in NYC came together to help people in need dealing with natural disasters and various crises, and formed K.I.D.S. (Kids In Distressed Situations). The world’s response that year to the famine in Ethiopia helped trigger the idea of taking new, excess product from the industry and donating it to people in need. We also supported victims of the historic 1985 mudslides in Colombia that killed 23,000 people. In 2005, executives from the adult apparel and home fashion industries came together to help U.S. victims of Hurricanes Rita and Katrina, and formed our “other half” — Fashion Delivers. On April 7, 2014 our two charities merged to better serve their local nonprofit partners and the donors of new product.

Q.) Your organization provides kids and adults with new products, including apparel, home furnishings, toys, books and school supplies, among many other items. Do you get to see any of the faces of the families as they receive these items? What is that experience like?

Most of our donations are shipped from the donor company directly to the community nonprofit that will use the merchandise for clients in need. We don’t see the faces of the people receiving the donations, but our nonprofit partners provide us with pictures, letters and thank you notes from the clients. The feedback from the people being helped can be incredibly moving, as the need is so great. Staff and board members routinely visit our nonprofit partners so that we can see first-hand the challenges they face and the benefit of our donations. These visits are very poignant as well, with clients often sharing a mix of difficult journeys and hopeful futures.

Q.) What have been some of your organization’s greatest success stories of helping to lift families out of poverty and disaster?

Our experience helping families affected by Superstorm Sandy in the New York, New Jersey and Connecticut region was particularly emotional because that disaster was here on our doorstep, and because we continued to help people a year later. Our program with Skechers shoe brand BOBS has been especially helpful for poor families who need shoes for their growing children. Skechers manufactures a useful shoe especially for donation, in sizes to fit kids from age 2 to 12. Having this product made in a wide range of sizes and provided in reliable quantities helps us meet the needs of many poor families with growing kids.

Q.) An astounding $1.2 billion worth of products has been donated and distributed since 1985, when K.I.D.S. was founded. When you look at a staggering number like this, what does it tell you?

We’ve actually reached more than $1.3 billion in donations now, and that number reflects just how generous the fashion, children’s and home companies can be when helping people in need. Our industries are made up of very tight communities that have a lot of empathy and like to help people. We’re blessed to be born from such a group of giving businesses.

Q.) What are some of the brands and community partners that K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc. works with?

Some of our top product donors are Skechers, Toys R Us/Babies R Us, Burlington Stores, Carters/OshKosh B’gosh, Gerber Childrenswear, Gymboree, Men’s Wearhouse, Walt Disney Home Entertainment, H&M, and manufacturers Haddad Brands and Global Brands Group. Our community partners include individual community charities as well as local chapters of Boys & Girls Clubs, local schools and churches, foster kids agencies, armed services support groups, career training nonprofits and many more.

Q.) What are some ways people can get involved and help out your organization?

The easiest way for individuals to become involved is by donating money to us at DonateProduct.com – for every $10 donated we can move $100 of donated merchandise to someone who needs it. We receive about $150 million of donated product each year and transportation or shipping is one of our biggest costs. Additionally, individuals can hold drives to collect new product and donate it to us for delivery to a charity that desperately needs it.

Q.) What’s next for K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc.?

In 2016 we will continue to improve the services we provide to both our donors and our nonprofit community partners; we are also working on a new name and branding identity this year.

For more information on K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc., and the amazing work that they do, visit the official website at www.donateproduct.com.

http://www.opiogives.com/interviews-1/2016/3/30/an-interview-with-peter-paris-marketing-director-of-kidsfashion-delivers

Between long lines and crowded stores, going to the mall is exhausting—and time-consuming, especially when you have kids. That’s why ;Haim Dabah was inspired to create Kidbox, an affordable curated outfit-delivery service for kids that parents can order online.

“We hear from working parents that they feel guilty about not spending enough time with their children, and we know that all moms need more time,” Dabah, a founder and managing partner of HDS Capital, told Forbes. “Kidbox was created as a way to enable parents to save time and to not only shop from the convenience of [home], but also enjoy a positive experience together with kids while having fun in the discovery of affordable name brand style.”

To use Kidbox, all parents have to do is fill out an online questionnaire about their child’s fashion preferences, select a delivery method, and wait for the Kidbox to arrive. They’ll receive an assortment of six to seven handpicked items (and occasionally a few surprises for the kids, too). If the family decides they still like the garments after seven days, they can keep them and pay $98 for the lot, or exchange the garments for a different size. If parents decide to return some or all of the items, they won’t be charged for the clothing they don’t keep. Parents then give feedback via Kidbox’s website or app, which the company will use to make future wardrobe selections.

While Kidbox lets parents skip the mall, it also allows them to broach the subject of social responsibility with their kids. Taking a cue from brands like TOMS, Kidbox partnered with nonprofit K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers to outfit a child in need for every box purchased. Their goal is to eventually donate clothes to a million kids. Keeping with Kidbox’s custom theme, each package contains information on specific charities that families can choose to support.

“The excitement of getting new clothes is an ideal way for parents to begin the conversation with their kids about the essence of social responsibility,” Dabah told Forbes. It provides them with “the awesome experiences of getting and giving new clothes to other children while also fostering a culture of generosity.”

Check out some pictures below, or visit Kidbox’s website and Instagram for more information.

http://www.mentalfloss.com/article/77689/kids-style-box-lets-you-skip-malls-and-help-others-need

One of the hardest things about being a parent is making time for it all — quality time for your little ones, a bit of quiet and calm time for yourself, time for all the things that they need. One of those basic needs is clothing, but it’s often hard to find time to shop for yourself, let alone your kids. Kidbox, which launched today, is hoping to change the culture around shopping and make it more fun — and stress-free — for families.

Here’s how it works: You fill out a profile for each of your kids based on their likes and dislikes, and you get sent a box with six to seven items of clothing from brands such as Limited Too, 7 For All Mankind and Lucky Brand. For $98, you can keep the whole box and your card on file gets charged. You can return and exchange as needed, and leave feedback on the individual items so that your profile preferences get updated if you choose to order another box.

It’s not a subscription service, but more of an on-demand situation — your kids need clothes and you’re too busy to shop online or in-store, so Kidbox will do the work for you. But here’s where it gets good: Kidbox is also a one-for-one program, kind of like TOMS or Warby Parker. They’ve paired up with K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers to help bring that new clothing feeling to kids in need. It’s the largest non-profit devoted to donating kids’ clothes to those who need them, and the founders of Kidbox suggest that this might be a good teaching opportunity for social responsibility. Bonus: The super cool boxes are recyclable — and would make really great storage boxes for crafts, don’t you think?

Show off any kiddie clothing skills you have on Instagram with the hashtag #iamcreative!

http://www.brit.co/kidbox-kids-clothes/

Shopping doesn’t have to be just plain fun; shopping can also be done with a valuable purpose in mind. Kidbox is the first clothing style box solely focused on kids’ clothing. Beyond the fun and excitement in buying new clothes, the company aims to teach kids an important lesson.

Haim Dabah, founder of Kidbox, has a unique proposition in mind—one that parents and kids can mutually benefit from. The company’s mission states:

Kidbox is committed to providing parents and kids with effortless shopping experiences, while empowering families to be socially responsible. Through Kidbox Cares​, parents share with their kids the impactful experience of getting and giving new clothes to other children.

When a parent and child purchases a box of clothes from Kidbox, the company donates clothes to a kid in need. The child is who will actually choose which specific cause he or she wants to donate to. Some of the choices include donating to homeless children, military families, single parent households, disaster relief and many more.

The child answers a short questionnaire so that Kidbox can learn about the child’s clothing preferences and styles. After that, the parents will complete the questionnaire. Kidbox will then use the information to fill up the box with custom style collections.

Each box contains six to seven high quality branded pieces handpicked for the child. The pieces can be ensembles or separates. Some of the boxes may have a fun and educational surprise for the little customers, too.

The fun begins once the box is delivered. The parent and child can enjoy unpacking the box together. Parents and children have seven days to decide whether they want to keep the clothes, exchange for sizes or return some/all items. On the seventh day, parents will have to pay for what they want to keep. If the parent and child want to keep everything, then they are given the opportunity to give back, which means choosing a cause to donate to.

http://www.psfk.com/2016/03/subscription-clothing-box-for-kids-shop-with-a-cause-kidbox.html

For parents, shopping for kids clothing can be a hassle – especially if they are unsure about their child’s preferences. Malls and shopping outlets offer a number of clothing stores, but there is still a hole in the market, which is why Haim Dabah created Kidbox.

Dabah is transforming the kid clothing market with a box that offers designer brands and reasonable prices.

“Within the kids clothing space, I wanted to save families time on shopping, while providing them a convenient (and fun) way to shop and share in the experience with their kids,” says Dabah.

In addition to providing children with an exciting opportunity to shop online, Kidbox provides the following features:

National Brands which include 7 for all Mankind, Lucky Brand, Reebok and Butter
6-7 items per box for only $98
While there are currently other boxes on the market, Kidbox has set itself apart in a number of ways.

“Our competitive advantage lies in our unique approach to the box model. There are no subscription or styling fees, and there are no obligations or upfront payments, meaning you can skip deliveries at any time,” says Dabah.
Not only is the company’s box model a key to its success, but it also relies on unique technology to help predict style preferences.

“We have nine engineers, based out of Tel Aviv, that are involved in the development of a custom code, with a focus on advanced A.I. and a machine learning algorithm that assists Kidbox stylists in creating a unique and personalized style assortment for each child,” says Dabah.

More About Kidbox and Its Plans for the Future
In the future, Kidbox plans to donate clothes to over a million children with help from its consumers and K.I.D.S/Fashion Delivers, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

“We also have plans to expand our size range beyond sizes 4-16, build a loyal customer base and a robust community of families who are empowered to be give,” says Dabah who is a founding board member of K.I.D.S/ Fashion Delivers.

Additionally, Kidbox’s mission is to help parents in teaching their children to give back.

“I wanted to create Kidbox and offer families a fun-filled box to open with their kids while also contributing new clothing to children in need,” says Dabah who explains the company will donate a piece of clothing for every Kidbox sold.
Dabah – a 30 year veteran in the fashion and branding industry – suggests that aspiring entrepreneurs find their passion before starting a company.

“It’s important to truly understand the industry as a whole, your target customer as well as the gaps in the market before taking on your own endeavor,” says Dabah. “But no matter which direction you go in, build a business plan where you make money on your first transaction. In other words, make money on the first box.”

http://tech.co/kidbox-kids-clothes-philanthropy-2016-03

There are tons of services out there that send you boxed up versions of things you love, (Birchbox anyone) but we can’t help but notice there is few that are catered to the $27.9 billion childrenswear market.

Well Kidbox, a new kid-centric service that delivers personalized boxes of stylish clothes for kids sizes 4 to 16, wants to change that.

The NYC-based company is helmed by industry vet Haim Dabah and funded by HDS Capital (yeah, that HDS Capital). Dabah didn’t disclose any dollar amounts, but says Kidbox is also partially funded by himself, and an early seed round the brand closed last December funded by First Time Ventures.

So how does the service work?

Parents and their children fill out a brief questionnaire about their child’s style preferences.

Using that information, the team at Kidbox handpicks six to seven pieces from a range of popular brands like 7 For All Mankind, Lucky Brand and Catherine|Catherine Malandrino, then delivers them straight to their doors.

Families then have seven days to decide if they want to keep everything in the box, which will cost them $98, keep a few items that are charged a la carte, exchange sizes or return items.

To sweeten the deal, Kidbox has a goal to donate clothes to one million needy children, so the company also outfits a child in need for every complete Kidbox purchased through its philanthropic foundation Kidbox Cares.

Kidbox partnered with K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, a non­profit that collects and distributes new clothing to U.S. based children in need, to create the foundation.

Dabah says Kidbx’s core mission is to encourage families to choose a specific cause they wish the donation to support, while starting the conversation about giving between parent and child.

“The charity aspect is part of our DNA,” Dabah says. “There are very few charities out there that give new clothing to children in need and to see the little kids get so excited about getting new clothes — it literally brings tears to your eyes.”

And for anyone weary of committing to a monthly subscription box service, Dabah says there are no worries here.

“It’s not a monthly service,” he says. “Mom’s do not shop for kids on a monthly basis, they shop seasonally.”

Well said, Haim. Well said.

http://www.fashinvest.com/kidbox-is-the-coolest-new-way-to-buy-clothes-for-your-kids/

The Tel Aviv- and New York-based team behind Kidbox, a price-conscious, curated outfit-delivery service launched today, is on a mission to minimize the hassles faced by parents who want cute/cool/badass/durable clothing for their little ones, but they’ve also got their new site set toward fixing a much bigger problem: each $98 package of national-brand kids’ duds also sponsors an outfit for a child in need and, as company co-founder and CEO Haim Dabah explains, contains an opportunity for Kidbox recipients to learn the importance of giving.

Dabah, formerly a driving force behind the Gitano Group, Inc. and who co-founded Kidbox with his son Morris, explained via email that three decades in the fashion world inspired him to create the new brand-to-consumer service. “It has been apparent to me for some time that the way people want to shop is changing,” he said, “and today there is technology that exists to make it happen.”

For families that’re sick of the time and expense involved in keeping children’s wardrobes well-stocked, Kidbox provides brand-name outfits that’ve been assembled according to stylist, customer, and algorithm input at savings of up to 30%, Dabah says, but also a way to make getting dressed fun again for both kids and parents. He noted,

“We hear from working parents that they feel guilty about not spending enough time with their children, and we know that all moms need more time. Kidbox was created as a way to enable parents to save time and to not only shop from the convenience of [home], but also enjoy a positive experience together with kids while having fun in the discovery of affordable name brand style.”

Part of the fun, Dabah says, is opening packages as a family to see what six- or seven-item ensemble’s inside, having kids help decide which items to keep or return within a week of receiving their Kidbox, and even finding small fun and/or educational extras inside. The Israeli-American entrepreneur also pointed out, however, that deliveries from the company–which is primarily funded by HDS Capital, where Dabah is a founding and managing partner–will also contain information on different agencies or charities for families to review together, allowing kids to learn about the giving side of the Kidbox equation and even choose where each donated outfit ends up (as long as the family keeps an entire $98 box to trigger the donation).

To bring new, quality clothing to children in need, the company has partnered with K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, a wide-reaching non-profit that serves more than 1,000 agencies and community partners. In addition to processing large apparel donations from various national brands, the organization also handles cash donations, supplies for everyday and disaster-related needs, and group fundraising events (about $1.3 billion-worth since 1985, all told). Dabah explained that, for him, the partnership was a natural fit:

“As a founding board member of K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, I understand the significance of new clothes for children in need. I wanted to also create a meaningful mission to be at the core of the Kidbox brand, which is why we decided to create Kidbox Cares. Kidbox Cares allows parents to share with their kids the experience of getting and giving new clothes to other children, with the ultimate goal of donating new clothes to one million needy children throughout the U.S.”

Being very familiar with the effect that some fresh threads can have on any kid, from the most privileged to the most in need, Dabah stressed that teaching the next generation of fashion-forward citizens about the importance of giving back is key to making a sustainable, responsible clothing industry. “The excitement of getting new clothes is an ideal way for parents to begin the conversation with their kids about the essence of social responsibility,” he says, and lets them share “the awesome experiences of getting and giving new clothes to other children while also fostering a culture of generosity.”

Kidbox has gone on record with its goal of clothing a million children in need, and “the participation of [Kidbox] customers makes this all possible,” Dabah notes. Hopefully–if fashionistas will please pardon both the pun and the suggestion of copying another’s style–other clothiers will soon follow suit.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/janetwburns/2016/03/29/kidbox-delivers-brand-name-fashion-that-helps-outfit-kids-in-need-too/#6d220a23764e

(FOX 5 NEWS) – Unpacking happiness. That’s the motto of Kidbox, a brand new startup that launched March 29, 2016, in Midtown Manhattan. The company is designed to make dressing kids easier for parents and more fun for the kids, while also helping a family in need.

Father and son team Haim and Morris Dabah came up with the idea. The two have decades of experience in retail.

Haim has been in the fashion business for over 30 years, most recently working as venture capitalist investing in tech startups. Morris runs a company that licenses kids’ clothing. They thought, why not bring those two worlds together and create a box service for kids?

Morris describes Kidbox as a box full of cool new clothes and fun surprises. He says to think of it as a gift box addressed to your children. Parents go on www.kidbox.com, answer a few questions, and wait for their first box in the mail. Haim says parents just need to fill out a quiz that takes about a minute and a half and then let Kidbox do all the work. The company will deliver a custom shopping experience right to their door.

Every Kidbox includes 6 to 8 pieces of clothing, crayons and stickers to design the box, and a surprise ball for the kids to unravel. Parents have 7 days to decide what they want to keep. Take the whole box for $98, or pay for individual pieces a la carte.

Morris says they choose the best-selling items of the season: the most sought-after sweatshirts, shorts, and denim.

When families open the box together they can also have a conversation about helping children who don’t have new clothing. For every Kidbox purchased, the company will donate another to a family in need.

Kidbox has teamed up with K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers to let Kidbox customers choose who they want to help. Lisa Gurwitch, president and CEO of K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, says this is an opportunity for families to talk about needs and to be able to designate that kids in their own area or around the country receive a new item as well. K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers started over 30 years ago and has donated over a billion dollars of clothing to families in need.

Kidbox is also hoping to help in a big way. The mission is to clothe a million children.

Kidbox is available for boys and girls, ages 2 to about 14. The clothing is from popular national brands like Butter, Diesel, and Seven for all Mankind.

If parents keep everything in the box it works out to about $14 to $16 per item. Parents will also love this isn’t a subscription service, so there’s no obligation. They also get free shipping and returns, and are not charged until they decide what they want to keep.

http://www.fox5ny.com/news/114609381-story

NEW YORK, Jan.14, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — In honor of National Hug Day on January 21, Cuddl Duds is partnering with K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers for the 2nd annual #CuddlHug campaign to help benefit children and families impacted by poverty and tragedy.

On National Hug Day, Cuddl Duds will post a #CuddlHug photo on Facebook (www.facebook.com/cuddlduds) and Twitter (@CuddlDuds). From Thursday, January 21st through Sunday, January 24th, for each ‘share’ on Facebook and ‘retweet’ on Twitter of the photo, Cuddl Duds will donate $1.00 to K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers (up to $20,000).

“The Cuddl Duds brand is rooted in the feeling of warmth, comfort and delight, and we look forward to be once again celebrating National Hug Day with a feel-good campaign that shares the comfort of a hug and the warmth of giving back,” said Mark Sandler, president, Komar Layering.

In addition, this year, Cuddl Duds will also pledge to donate one clothing item to K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers for each order placed on cuddlduds.com from Thursday, January 21st through Sunday, January 24th. K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers will then distribute the product that will benefit their network of community partners.

To help promote this year’s campaign, Cuddl Duds is partnering with actress and singer Elizabeth Elias. Liz will announce the campaign on her social media channels, inviting her 200,000+ followers to participate and give back.

“We are delighted to be working with Cuddl Duds again to spread the goodwill of National Hug Day,” said Lisa Gurwitch, president of K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers. “This year, with the additional donation of Cuddl Duds layers, we hope to bring some comfort and support to those in need.”

About K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers
K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc., a 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization, unites retailers, manufacturers, foundations and individuals to provide new merchandise to children, families, and people impacted by poverty and tragedy. Excess product, including apparel, accessories, shoes, home furnishings, toys, books, school supplies and other items, deliver hope and dignity to people in need through a network of community partners. For more information, visit www.donateproduct.com.

About Cuddl Duds®
At Cuddl Duds®, layering is a lifestyle. As the leading brand in warm layering, Cuddl Duds® offers the ultimate in cozy comfort without unnecessary bulk. Cuddl Duds® takes pride in being at the forefront of textile innovation, performance technologies and modern styling. For over fifty years, Cuddl Duds® has provided women with the latest essentials to build the foundations of a year-round layering wardrobe, and continues this legacy with brand extensions for men, kids and toddlers too. For more information, visit www.cuddlduds.com.

About Komar
Established in 1908, Komar is a global consumer apparel company, specializing in the design, marketing, sourcing and distribution of sleepwear, loungewear, intimates, and layering products. The company is an industry leader across a diverse range of competitive retail categories. Komar is proud to represent more than 100 lifestyle brands and licenses through their retail partners, which sell worldwide at every price point. For more information, visit www.komarbrands.com.

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/cuddl-duds-teams-up-with-kidsfashion-delivers-for-national-hug-day-300204187.html

COLUMBIA, SC (WACH) – A shopping experience to help flood victims put on by the City of Columbia and K.I.D.S/ Fashion Delivers took place over the weekend.

The event allowed flood victims a chance to shop for the holidays and take home items such as, furniture, clothing and toys.

K.I.D.S/Fasion Delivers donated over $1.3 million of good to the event.

A total of 953 households attended the experience at Dutch Fork Square, with 465 of those families coming out Saturday.

The Holiday Pop-Up Shop also saw about 46 volunteers a day to help assist shoppers.

http://wach.com/news/local/columbias-holiday-pop-up-shop-assists-nearly-1000-families

Flood survivors to shop for free this weekend

Staff Report
colanews@scbiznews.com
Published Dec. 11, 2015

Flood victims will be able to pick up nearly $1.3 million in donated gifts free of charge this weekend as part of a new city initiative, Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin said.

Launching today and running through Sunday, the Holiday Pop-Up Shop will serve as a resource for flood survivors to pick up new bedding, toys, furniture and clothing. Companies such as Aeropostale, Free People, GAP, Gerber Childrenswear, Hot Topic, IKEA and Toys R Us are all represented in the event, created in partnership with K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers.

“This is about giving more than a new couch, clothes or even a present under the tree,” Benjamin said. “This is about giving hope and I couldn’t be more proud.”

The event, which will set up at Dutch Square Mall, will require a FEMA letter in order to be eligible. It will run from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. today, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.

“Over 400 companies donate to us every year, helping people affected by natural disasters or the daily distress of poverty,” said Lisa Gurwitch, president and CEO of K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers. “For disasters we concentrate on basic necessity items in apparel – like underwear, t-shirts and jeans – and home furnishings such as comforters, sheets, pillows and towels.

“For manufacturers and retailers, the problem of excess product can be turned into a humanitarian solution for people in need.”

http://columbiabusinessreport.com/news/56490-flood-survivors-to-shop-for-free-this-weekend

The city of Columbia on Friday evening opened a weekend Holiday Pop-Up Shop for flood victims.

Working in conjunction with K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, the store at Dutch Square Mall is offering free shopping just in time for the holidays, which this year will be a struggle for some.

Since 1985, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers has gathered new product donations from suppliers and retailers in the fashion, home and children’s industries, then delivered them to people in need worldwide.

Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/news/local/article49373870.html#storylink=cpy

COLUMBIA, SC (WACH) – Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin helped kick off the Holiday Pop-Up Shop from Friday afternoon.

Benjamin is describing the event as “A free private shopping experience for flood survivors.”

“This is about giving more than a new couch, clothes or even a present under the tree,” said Mayor Benjamin. “This is about giving hope and I couldn’t be more proud.”

K.I.D.S/ Fashion Delivers collected $1.7 million worth of items that are available at the event.

Families impacted by the historic floods can get brand new bedding, toys, furniture and clothing. Brands that we will be available to shoppers include Aeropostle, GAP, Gerber Childrenswear, IKEA, Toy R Us and much more.

The Pop-Up Shop is at the Dutch Square Mall and runs Friday 5pm to 9pm (Community Partners Only), Saturday 10 to 6 and Sunday 1 to 5.

To participate in this shopping event you must provide a FEMA letter when you arrive.

http://wach.com/news/local/mayor-benjamin-hosting-free-shopping-event-for-flood-victims

COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) –
Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin has announced a “free, private shopping experience for flood survivors” happening this weekend.

The event, open to those across the region who were displaced by the Midlands’ historic floods in early October, will take place at Dutch Square Mall Friday – Sunday.

To be eligible for a shopping pass for brand new bedding, toys, furniture, and clothing, flood victims must provide a valid photo ID and a FEMA letter.

“This is a really significant effort,” Benjamin said. “We are really excited about the prospect of helping those affected by the floods. We’ll be distributing well over a million dollars worth of products. Maybe we can make the season of giving a little brighter for some.

Brands taking part in what’s being called the “Holiday Pop-Up Shop” are: Aeropostale, Free People, GAP, Gerber, Hot Topic, IKEA, Melissa & Doug, Toys “R” Us and others.

Shopping hours:

Friday, December 11th 5:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. (Reserved for Community Partners & NOT FOR GENERAL PUBLIC)
Saturday, December 12th 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Sunday, December 13th 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Dutch Square Mall
421 Bush River Road

“This is about giving more than a new couch, clothes or even a present under the tree,” Benjamin said. “This is about giving hope and I couldn’t be more proud.”

The event is made possible through K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc. According to its website, the company helps “fight poverty and tragedies through the gift of new products, including apparel, accessories, shoes, home furnishings, toys, books, school supplies and other items. Excess merchandise is donated from companies that make or market the goods, and we deliver hope and dignity to people in need through community nonprofit partners. Since 1985, over $1 billion of donated products have been distributed through our network, serving the poor and disadvantaged worldwide.”

“Over 400 companies donate to us every year, helping people affected by natural disasters or the daily distress of poverty. For disasters we concentrate on basic necessity items in apparel – like underwear, t-shirts and jeans – and home furnishings such as comforters, sheets, pillows and towels,” Lisa Gurwitch, president and CEO of K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers said. “For manufacturers and retailers, the problem of excess product can be turned into a humanitarian solution for people in need.”

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers has secured at least $1.3 million in new product donated for South Carolina relief efforts to date.

There is a quota for how much of each item flood victims can take.

For more information, go to Steve Benjamin’s website.

Copyright 2015 WIS. All rights reserved.

http://www.live5news.com/story/30714575/free-shopping-offered-to-flood-victims

NEW YORK-The K.I.D.S/Fashion Delivers annual gala fundraiser, which was held at the American Museum of Natural History here, raised $1.8 million in donations.
The gala marked the charitable organization’s 30th anniversary. “Our gala allows us to continue our mission and provide brand new product to children, families, and individuals in need nationwide and abroad,” said Lisa Gurwitch, president and CEO of the organization.

The event also honored Stuart Brister of Wells Fargo Capital Finance, Dow Famulak of Global Brands Group and Shikshya Foundation Nepal’s co-founder, designer Prabal Gurung. Gurung was accompanies by actress Amanda Seyfried, who presented him with his award.

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers has been operating its “Bring It Home” campaign, receiving donations of apparel, housewares and home textiles for disaster victims. Recent efforts here include providing products for victims of the recent floods in South Carolina and of wildfires in northern California.

http://www.hfnmag.com/news/kidsfashion-delivers-fundraiser-pulls-18-million/

he company donated its ABC Kids Expo booth furniture to the nonprofit.
Kids Today Staff — Kids Today, November 11, 2015
DAVIE, Fla. – Baby K’tan, LLC recently donated furniture to the nonprofit Kids in Distressed Situations (K.I.D.S.), a nonprofit that offers assistance to families struggling with poverty and tragic situations.

On the last day of the 2015 ABC Kids Expo, Baby K’tan donated what could serve as an entire living room of furniture – two futons, four side tables and six shelving units – to the organization. Volunteers for K.I.D.S. collected the items and shipped them off to be used locally in the Las Vegas area.

“Each year, we’ve seen some amazing donations by fellow exhibitors at the end of the show,” said Reina Christian, marketing manager, Baby K’tan. “We were absolutely honored and humbled to be able to participate, as well. Philanthropy is an important part of our corporate culture, and this year we had the chance to serve local Las Vegas families with the much-needed furniture donation.”

Brainstorming for a re-launched booth at ABC 2016 is well underway and Tali Zipper, director of marketing is the creative mind behind the new booth’s layout. “We’re aiming for a clean and simple look that is both functional and welcoming,” said Zipper.

“We understand that buyers are on their feet all day and we want to make sure they can relax at our booth, even if it is just for a moment.”

http://www.kidstodayonline.com/article/525750-baby-ktan-donates-furniture-kids

Global Brands’ Famulak among honorees at foundation fundraiser.

Dow Famulak, president and executive director, Global Brands Group, was honored at the annual K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers gala fundraiser at New York City’s American Museum of Natural History, Nov. 4.

Angelique Famulak presented the honor to her husband, which recognizes his charitable contributions, saying: “Dow is always there to lend a helping hand.”

In addition, professional soccer star David Beckham sent a special video congratulating Famulak, his longtime friend and business partner.

Famulak, who joined Li & Fung Group in 2000 holding various senior management roles, became president of Global Brands Group when the company was formed in July 2014. He assumed the additional role of chief operating officer in July.

The K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers event, which showcases how new products donated throughout the year provide “hope, dignity, and self-esteem” to people and children in need, raised $1.75 million dollars, and additionally honored Stuart M. Brister, president of the Commercial Services division of Wells Fargo Capital Finance, and high fashion designer Prabal Gurung on behalf of Shikshya Foundation.

Harry Lennix of NBC’s “The Blacklist” and Jessica Abo, NY1 news reporter, acted as co-hosts for the event.

Major supporters of K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers include Belk, Burlington Stores, Coach, Cushman & Wakefield, G-III Apparel Group, Global Brands Group, J.C. Penny, Kohl’s, Li & Fung, Macy’s, Morgan Stanley, Prabal Gurung, PVH, Perry Ellis International, Ralph Lauren and Wells Fargo.

Photo captions (top): Dow Famulak, Global Brands Group, receives his award. (Bottom, from left): Stuart Brister, Wells Fargo Capital Finance; Amanda Seyfried, actress; Prabal Gurung, fashion designer; and Dow Famulak, Global Brands Group. Photos courtesy of Getty Images.

K.I.D.S/Fashion Delivers, which donates clothing, furniture, and home goods to over 1,000 community partners throughout the world, held its annual gala at the Museum of Natural History in New York City on Wednesday, November 4. Over 600 guests dined underneath the museum’s famed blue whale, and toured the legendary halls before and after dinner. Centerpieces incorporated knitted gloves that would then be donated to needy children and others. The event raised over $1.75 million for the charity.

Actor Harry Lennix (who co-stars on NBC’s The Blacklist) and NY1 anchor Jessica Abo hosted the gala, which honored Global Brands Group president Dow Famulak; Stuart Brister, president of Wells Fargo Capital Finance’s Commercial Services; and award-winning fashion designer Prabal Gurung, co-founder of Shikshya Foundation Nepal. Guests and presenters included actress Amanda Seyfried, Columbia, South Carolina mayor Stephen K. Benjamin, Allan Ellinger of MMG Advisors, Gary F. Simmons of Gerber Childrenswear LLC, and many industry executives. Soccer great David Beckham saluted Famulak via a special video message.

In his acceptance speech, Gurung thanked the fashion industry for their support of his efforts, which has included helping those who were affected by the recent earthquakes in Nepal, as well as the education of his country’s uneducated youth – especially young females. “I have always believed in the importance of girls’ education,” said Gurung. “Investing in youth is the best possible investment for the future, and I truly believe in a world where someday we will see an equal amount of women in power as men.”
http://www.mr-mag.com/schmoozing-k-i-d-s-fashion-delivers-gala/

Screen Shot 2015-11-19 at 2.35.10 PM

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/11/06/fashion/20151108-bill-cunningham-evening-hours.html?_r=2

More than 700 people came out Wednesday night to support K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers at the American Museum of Natural History, raising more than $1.7 million at the annual gala.

The event honored Dow Famulak, president and executive director of Global Brands Group; Stuart Brister, president of the Commercial Services division of Wells Fargo Capital Finance, and Prabal Gurung on behalf of Shikshya Foundation Nepal.

Gurung spoke about the foundation he cofounded, Shikshya Foundation Nepal, and how he’s pursuing his passion for education and impacting lives. Four years ago, they began supporting 12 displaced girls. Now they support 250 children with scholarships and educational programs. “I’ve always been a believer in girls’ education. I feel that investing in today’s youth is the best investment in the future.” With Nepal having suffered from two devastating earthquakes in April, the foundation has invested in rebuilding efforts, as well as education and learning projects for affected families.

Famulak’s wife, Angelique, presented him with his award, with their two young children in tow. A personal message from David Beckham (who has a venture with Global Brands Group) was presented via video. Famulak said he became friendly with Beckham and they took a spin class together. “It was like a greyhound racing with a pug,” he said. Famulak said the people in the audience get up each morning and can support their families, but there are parents who get up in the morning, and don’t know where their clothes and food will be coming from that day. “To paraphrase David [Beckham], it’s simply unacceptable.”

Wells Fargo’s Kevin Gillespie took the stage next and presented to his boss, Brister, saying, “I don’t know what you did, but you got me,” to which Brister replied, “Don’t kid yourself, you’re our Beckham.”

Brister said the reason he likes K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is because “it’s real and it’s tangible.” He said that 97 cents of every dollar raised goes to the cause.

Industry executives such as Laurence C. Leeds, Mark Weber, Abbey Doneger, John Pomerantz, Paul Rosengard, Victor Azrak, Rick Darling and Michael Setola were among those who attended. There was also some star power: Amanda Seyfried, dressed in a black and silver sequined Gurung gown, arrived with the designer to present him with his award. The charity’s co-chairmen, Allan Ellinger and Gary F. Simmons, welcomed attendees to the gala in the blue whale room, and Lisa Gurwitch, president and chief executive officer of K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, gave the closing remarks.

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers receives donations of new products from more than 400 companies that are distributed through more than 1,000 community partner charitable organizations. Since the charity began 30 years ago,more than $1.2 billion of donated products have been distributed to the poor and disadvantaged worldwide.

http://wwd.com/markets-news/juniors/k-i-d-s-fashion-delivers-raises-more-than-1-7-million-at-annual-gala-10274274/

Deb Gordon’s guest was Lisa Gurwitch, President and CEO of K.I.D.S/Fashion Delivers, Inc., a New York based non-profit started in 1985 that provides brand new items including clothes, shoes, toys, and books to children in need in the U.S, and abroad.

Ms. Gurwitch discussed how the organization helps to improve the lives of those they serve by working with community partners in the fashion, home and children’s industries who donate new products for distribution by non-profit agencies.

Since its inception, K.I.D.S/Fashion Delivers has distributed over $1.2 billion of donated products to the poor and disadvantaged.

“The organizations that we work with tell us how valuable it is for them to be able to offer things like newborn clothing to families that they are working with…These are people who are struggling with obstacles that you and I would find very difficult to overcome. So, I have tremendous respect for people who are trying to overcome addiction or trying to break the cycle of poverty in their own families,” said Gurwich.

Spotlighted the K.I.D.S/Fashion Delivers November 4th gala fundraiser at The American Museum of Natural History, which will honor individuals and organizations who have joined the K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers efforts, and are dedicated to helping to foster their mission to provide hope, dignity and self-esteem to people and children in need.

Renown fashion designer, Prabal Gurung will accept the award on behalf of Shikshya Foundation Nepal for their relief efforts after their devastating earthquake.

Other notable attendees and supporters at this year’s event will include CFDA’s Steven Kolb, actress Amanda Seyfried, and singer Neil Diamond.

For more information, and to donate, visit www.DonateProduct.com.

–Deb Gordon/Fresh 102.7

http://fresh1027.cbslocal.com/2015/11/02/fm-magazine-kids-fashion-delivers/

NEW YORK – As K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers gears up for its 30th anniversary gala fundraiser on Nov. 4, the charitable foundation is also putting more effort into recruiting purveyors of essential home goods.

Each year, the organization gathers new product donations from suppliers and retailers in the fashion, home and children’s industries, then delivers them to people in need. Since 1985, over the combined organization has distributed more than $1.2 billion of donated products to the poor and disadvantaged worldwide.

Recent efforts include assisting families displaced by flooding in South Carolina and wild fires in northern California. K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is still provisioning people in the Mid-Atlantic who lost their homes during Hurricane Sandy and remain uprooted.

Key products needed from the home furnishings industry include comforters, sheets, pillows and towels. The organization partners with non-profits and government agencies in all 50 states to collect and distribute goods. It also assists disaster victims worldwide. “We had a major presence in Haiti [after the 2012 earthquake],” she noted.

“We concentrate on basic necessity items,” said Lisa Gurwitch, CEO, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers. “We pick up from stores, warehouses and distribution centers. That’s how we keep our overhead low.”

Himatsingka America, for example, recent donated Lady Antebellum Heartland merchandise from its North Carolina facility to the program helping people in South Carolina.

“Even overseas companies are carrying domestic inventory in anticipation of replenishment orders,” said Himatsingka America president David Greenstein. “At a certain point, some inventories get close to not being worth much to the manufacturer – but they’re worth a great deal to people who need help.”

He added: “Your difficulty [as an inventory holder] becomes someone else’s solution.”

Li & Fung was a founding member of Fashion Delivers, which merged with K.I.D.S. in April 2014. Rick Darling, the sourcing giant’s executive director of government and public affairs, told H&TT that “turning leftover , new inventory into life changing items for families in their time of need was more valuable in most cases then selling the goods off price.”

The merger of Fashion Delivers and K.I.D.S. “was a game changer,” he added, “and our new reach out to the home industry has the potential for the same impact”.

The K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers gala fundraiser will take place Wednesday, Nov. 4 at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Honorees include Stuart M. Brister of Wells Fargo Capital Finance, Dow Famulak of Global Brands Group , and Shikshya Foundation Nepal with its co- founder Prabal Gurung , the renowned fashion designer.

http://www.giftsanddec.com/article/525295-kidsfashion-delivers-reach-out-home-industry

New York Fashion Week S/S 2016 Kids Rock Fashion Show

New York Fashion Week kicked off with a fun and fearless show that celebrated fashionable children and raised awareness and millions worth of donations for K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers.

New York Fashion Week S/S 2016 Kids Rock Fashion Show
Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for NYFW: The Shows
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The Kids Rock! Fashion Show was hosted Dascha Polanco from Orange is the New Black. Every year, the Kids Rock! Fashion Show benefits a charity that supports children. This year the show supported The Victor Cruz Foundation.

The show was star studded event that included modeling from celebrity children Kennedy Cruz (daughter of New York Giants’ Victor Cruz), Mason and Braydon Wilkerson (sons of actress Melissa Joan Hart), Jaid and Jax Beauvais (children of actress and model Garcelle Beauvais), Antonia and Joey Gorga (children of The Real Housewives of New Jersey Melissa and Joe Gorga), Johan Jackson (son of rapper Fabolous) and may more.

The celebrity child models walked the runway multi-brands including Nike, Levi’s, Jordan, Converse, and Hurley.

More about the Victor Cruz Foundation: Off the field, New York Giants star Victor Cruz has devoted his time to numerous causes and is an active philanthropist. He created the Victor Cruz Foundation in 2012, which provides a full array of support for youth to achieve success in the workforce and life. Focusing on STEAM education (science, technology, engineering, art and math) college preparedness, financial literacy and living a healthy lifestyle, The Victor Cruz Foundation helps children from all backgrounds fulfill their potential for a brighter future.

More about K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers: K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc. is the charity of choice for new product donations made by hundreds of companies in the fashion, home and children’s industries. Donating new merchandise provides these companies with a simple and effective way to help people in need. Founded 30 years ago, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that unites retailers, manufacturers, foundations and individuals to support people affected by poverty and tragedy. K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is an extremely efficient charity, with more than 97% of revenue dedicated to its charitable program of distributing apparel, accessories, shoes, home furnishings, toys, books and other useful items. Since 1985, over $1.2 billion of donated products have been distributed through our network of community partners, serving the poor and disadvantaged worldwide. For more information, please visit www.DonateProduct.com.

http://www.examiner.com/article/new-york-fashion-week-s-s-2016-kids-rock-fashion-show

KIDS ROCK! NEW YORK FASHION WEEK
POSTER CHILD MAGSEPTEMBER 14, 2015

With over 60 years producing kidswear from brands like, Nike SB, Jordan, Converse, Hurley, and Levi’s – the Haddad group knows a thing or two about what kids love to wear, feel comfortable in and can ROCK day-in n’ day-out.

During last week’s presentation there were quite a few familiar faces to be spotted on the catwalk! Along with top child models, a host of celebrity kid models took centre stage too: Kennedy Cruz, daughter of New York Giants’ Victor Cruz and wife Elaina; Carter, Carsten, Cyia, and Jaden Sabathia, children of Amber and New York Yankees’ CC Sabathia; Jack and Jasmine Barker, children of photographer and TV personality Nigel Barker; and Mason and Braydon Wilkerson, children of actress Melissa Joan Hart — just to name a few!

The KIDS ROCK! fashion show – hosted during New York Fashion week – not only presents some of the coolest athletic and sportswear for kids, it also supports some great children’s charities too! Haddad has donated nearly 400,000 items of kids clothes to K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers – a non-profit that, with new merchandise effectively distributed through a network of agency partners, works to improve the well-being, self-esteem and dignity of at-risk children, families, and individuals.

Take a look at some of our favourite fashions from the show with photos provided courtesy of Nathan Blaney.

http://posterchildmag.com/2015/09/kids-rock-new-york-fashion-week/

Fashion Week is in full swing, and one show put kids in the spotlight to support a good cause.

At the Kids Rock! Fashion Show sponsored by Haddad Brands, the young ones strut, dance and tumble down the runway, dressed in the latest from from Nike, Jordan, Levi’s, Converse and Hurley. This year’s show benefited the Victor Cruz Foundation, which supports STEM programming across the country. Kids Rock! also announced a donation of millions of dollars worth of products to K.I.D.S. Fashion Delivers.

“We’re actually receiving the apparel, brand new clothes that will go to kids around the country that can really use it this time of year,” said Lisa Gurwitch, CEO of K.I.D.S. Fashion Delivers.

“The kids have so much fun with it. You can see how much fun they have walking the runway, showing their personality, wearing all the different clothes they wear day in and day out, so it’s always a good time,” said Victor Cruz, NFL player and founder of the Victor Cruz Foundation.

The Kids Rock! show raises money for a different charity every fashion week.

http://www.ny1.com/nyc/manhattan/news/2015/09/13/kids-rock–takes-fashion-week-for-a-good-cause.html

KIDS ROCK!
Last night, the catwalk was conquered by kids as part of New York Fashion Week.
Music blared and the crowd went wild as Haddad Brands presented Kids Rock!, a multi-brand show at New York Fashion Week last night. Brands included Nike, Jordan, Levi’s, Converse and Hurley, all in support of a good cause.
Haddad has donated nearly 400,000 items of kids clothes to K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, distributing them to more than 20 local non-profits around the country, including the foundations of the athletes participating in the Kids Rock! show: Carmelo Anthony, Amar’e Stoudemire, Victor Cruz, Derek Jeter and CC Sabathia.
Plenty of celebrity guests were on hand, including Carmelo and Lala Anthony, Nigel Barker, Victor and Elaina Cruz, Melissa Joan Hart, Fern Mallis and Chanel Iman. Musical performances were also given by rising stars Olivia Summerlin and Kaya Stewart.
We were thrilled to be part of the action! Needless to say, the kids (and the clothes) were adorable!

http://www.earnshaws.com/2015/09/blog/kids-rock/

A-List Kids Rock at N.Y. Fashion Week Show
SEPTEMBER 11, 2015 – 1:07 PM – 0 COMMENTS

It was all about watching the kids strut the catwalk at the fourth annual Kids Rock! Fashion show at New York Fashion Week last night, as they modeled the upcoming Spring 2016 collections from such top brands as Levi’s, Hurley, Nike, Jordan and Converse.

And we’re not talking about just any youngsters. Nearly 30 adorable A-list kids, including Kennedy Cruz (daughter of New York Giants’ Victor Cruz) and Mason and Braydon Wilkerson, sons of actress Melissa Joan Hart, walked the fashion week runway with the offspring of actors as well as players for the New York Yankees, Knicks and Jets.

Each kid was cuter than the next but the little one who drew the most applause—and a standing ovation, too: The braver than brave Leah Still, the 5-year-old daughter of Cincinnati Bengals player Devon Still, who recently finished treatments for stage-4 neuroblastoma, who wore a T-shirt emblazoned with the words #LeahStill as she beamed to the audience.

The star-studded benefit show was punctuated with celeb appearances from Dascha Polanco from Orange is the New Black, who served as emcee, and a welcome speech by Victor Cruz, whose foundation, which focuses on teaching children resiliency, commitment and perseverance, was this year’s beneficiary organization.

In between getting a glimpse at the super-fun spring looks from these major brands, including kid faves like board shorts, hoodies, leggings, graphic Ts and high-tops, guests were treated to performances by electronic/pop star Kaya Stewart and pop singer/songwriter Olivia Summerlin, who later rejoined the kid models on the fashion week runway as they sashayed up and down for the last time.

And, with an announced donation of several million dollars of kids’ apparel to K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, which benefits a wide range of community nonprofits, it was hard not to be all smiles when the lights went up, signaling the end of yet another fantastic New York Fashion Week show.

http://parade.com/422398/lhochwald/a-list-kids-rock-at-new-york-fashion-week-show/

K.I.D.S. / Fashion Delivers held their 9th annual Women in Industry Luncheon honoring Women of Achievement at 583 Park Avenue. The honorees were Hot Topic’s SVP General Merchandise Manager, Cindy Levitt and Vice Chairman and Head of Strategic Accounts at Cushman & Wakefield, Laura Pomerantz.

K.I.D.S. / Fashion Delivers helps provide new clothing, accessories, shoes, furniture, toys, books and school supplies to children, families, men and women, challenged by poverty or recovering from natural disasters. Since 1985 the charity has donated over $1 billion products to their network of community nonprofits worldwide.

The posh luncheon was hosted by two-time Tony Award winning actress and singer, Christine Ebersole. Attendees enjoyed a gourmet meal, while Little Kids Rock performed an original song and watched awards be presented to Levitt and Pomerantz. K.I.D.S. / Fashion Delivers CEO, Lisa Gurwitch spoke about how committed she is about the organization. At the end of the awards ceremony, Ebersole gave a special performance of the melody, “New Words”. The afternoon was filled with inspiring and uplifting moments.

In 2015, K.I.D.S. / Fashion Delivers intend to increase product donations to $175 million to partners in areas of poverty in all 50 states and are currently working on support for the victims of the Nepal earthquake.

To learn more about K.I.D.S. / Fashion Delivers or to get involved go to www.DonateProduct.com. http://www.examiner.com/article/k-i-d-s-fashion-delivers-9th-annual-women-industry-luncheon

NEW YORK — K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers raised a record $330,000 at its ninth annual Women in Industry Luncheon on Wednesday.

The event, which took place at 583 Park Avenue, honored Cindy Levitt, senior vice president and general merchandise manager of Hot Topic, and Laura Pomerantz, vice chairman and head of strategic accounts at Cushman & Wakefield.

“They are both very distinguished in business and the community,” said Lisa Gurwitch, president and chief executive officer of K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers.

Christine Ebersole, a two-time Tony-winning artist, was the host and performed at the luncheon. K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers supports poverty-stricken children and families. Donations go all over the country, and the organization recently sent tents, blankets and sleeping bags to Nepal. The luncheon began with a performance by a children’s group, Little Kids Rock from P.S. 98 in Washington Heights, part of a national program supported by the Hot Topic Foundation.

Since 1985, when K.I.D.S. began, more than $1.2 billion of donated products have been distributed through their network of community nonprofits. Last year, 402 companies donated $155 million of new products that were distributed to 643 community partners, according to Allan Ellinger, cochairman of the K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers board and managing partner of MMG.

One woman who has benefited from K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is Christina Atkins, who spoke at the luncheon. Wearing an outfit donated from Nine West and Kasper via K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, she said she was looking for a permanent job. “I feel fierce in my professional suit,” she said. She received the suit from community partner, Bottomless Closet, an organization that suits up women for job interviews. Atkins said Bottomless Closet will give you a suit for a job interview, and if you get the job, they will outfit you with a week’s worth of clothing. Bottomless Closet also provides professional and personal workshops.

Levitt from Hot Topic told the audience that she became obsessed with fashion when she was in sixth grade and would make her own skirts and sew patches on her denim jeans. When she was once in the budget department of The May Co., her mother told her she could one day become a buyer for a store like that. She studied fashion and started as a buyer of budget accessories. In 1989, she moved from the May Co. to Hot Topic, and the company started opening stores. Today, the retailer has 665 Hot Topic stores and 300 Torrid unit.

Growing up in New Mexico, Levitt said she knew of hard times. Her mother was a teacher and her father had a rough time getting work. It was difficult to make ends meet with four children in the family and she appreciated the help they received so they could move to California. “That’s why giving back is so important to me. People helped us get back on our feet,” she said. She said Hot Topic and Torrid are now donating merchandise to K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers.

Marnie Pomerantz MacLean introduced her mother, Laura Pomerantz, and said her mother not only gives her time, resources and expertise to her family, but to other families as well. She said her mother taught her “that you can never give too much. Life is a series of challenges and it’s how we handle it that matters.”

Pomerantz thanked her family, friends and business partners “who are always there to step up and support me and my causes.” She told the audience that K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers provides “hope and dignity.”

“It empowers and provides opportunities for people to progress,” she said. am text block. Click edit button to change this text.

SKECHERS TO DONATE MORE THAN 62,000 PAIRS OF BOBS SHOES FOR EARTHQUAKE VICTIMS IN NEPAL
MANHATTAN BEACH, Calif. – May 14, 2015 – SKECHERS USA, Inc. (NYSE:SKX) today announced that through the Company’s charitable footwear donation program, BOBS from SKECHERS, it will give more than 62,000 pairs of new shoes to support children affected by the devastating 7.8- magnitude earthquake in Nepal. This much-needed donation will add to the Company’s 11 million-pairs distributed to children in need worldwide since the BOBS charitable program launched in 2011.
Working with donation partners K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers and Soles4Souls, more than 62,000 pairs of BOBS from SKECHERS donation shoes will be transported to Nepal to aid victims of the April 25 earthquake. The first delivery of more than 36,000 pairs is scheduled to arrive for May distribution. As more rubble is cleared and transitional housing is established for victims of the earthquake, an additional container of 26,000-plus pairs of BOBS will arrive in Nepal for distribution in August.
“BOBS was created as an ongoing program to help children in need around the world, but when a natural disaster strikes we need to step up even more to help families affected by these tragedies,” began SKECHERS president Michael Greenberg. “With reports of more than 300,000 homes destroyed, 16,000 people injured and thousands of lives lost, we need to do our part to help the people of Nepal rebuild. The need for food, water and shelter is critical, but shoes to protect a child’s feet can offer a feeling of comfort and safety in the midst of a chaotic disaster zone. We are happy to work with our charitable partners K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers and Soles4Souls to transport BOBS shoes into Nepal, and we hope this donation will help thousands of children in need.”
“In the last three years, BOBS from SKECHERS has generously provided us with more than 6 million pairs of shoes donated for children both here in the U.S. and around the world,” said K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers President Lisa D. Gurwitch. “These shoes are very special for us and the community partners with whom we work, because we can reliably plan on their arrival, we know how many there will be and we receive a size range to serve children from 2 years old through 12 years old. These shoes are an essential item and we strive to include them in programs where the children are also receiving other services and support so that we can be part of solution that helps the whole child.”
“Working with BOBS from SKECHERS for disaster response is powerful,” said Soles4Souls CEO, Buddy Teaster. “Working together, we were able to distribute more than 200,000 pairs of shoes following Typhoon Haiyan in 2013. Now the opportunity to help make a difference is in front of us and, once again, shoes will be an important part of helping tens of thousands of Nepalese get back on their feet.”
The BOBS donation in Nepal is SKECHERS’ latest contribution to help families affected by disaster; in addition to Typhoon Haiyan relief in the Philippines, previous donations have provided footwear for survivors of Hurricane Sandy in 2012 and victims of the devastating Haiti earthquake in 2010. BOBS also regularly donates its product to more than 30 countries worldwide, from communities in need in the United States to families around the globe.
Media Contact: Jennifer Clay SKECHERS USA, Inc.
310.937.1326

Designed for women and kids, SKECHERS donates new shoes to children in need when consumers purchase BOBS. Those who want to make a difference can find BOBS styles in stores nationwide and markets around the world.
About SKECHERS USA, Inc.
SKECHERS USA, Inc., based in Manhattan Beach, California, designs, develops and markets a diverse range of lifestyle footwear for men, women and children, as well as performance footwear for men and women. SKECHERS footwear is available in the United States and over 120 countries and territories worldwide via department and specialty stores, more than 1,050 SKECHERS retail stores, and the Company’s e-commerce website. The Company manages its international business through a network of global distributors, joint venture partners in Asia, and 12 wholly-owned subsidiaries in Brazil, Canada, Chile, Japan and throughout Europe. For more information, please visit skechers.com and follow us on Facebook (facebook.com/SKECHERS) and Twitter (twitter.com/SKECHERSUSA).
This announcement contains forward-looking statements that are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements include, without limitation, the Company’s future growth, financial results and operations, its development of new products, future demand for its products and growth opportunities, its planned opening of new stores, advertising and marketing initiatives, and the expansion plans for the Company’s European Distribution Center. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward looking language such as “believe,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” “project,” “will be,” “will continue,” “will result,” “could,” “may,” “might,” or any variations of such words with similar meanings. Any such statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause or contribute to such differences include international economic, political and market conditions including the uncertainty of sustained recovery in Europe; entry into the highly competitive performance footwear market; sustaining, managing and forecasting costs and proper inventory levels; losing any significant customers; decreased demand by industry retailers and cancellation of order commitments due to the lack of popularity of particular designs and/or categories of products; maintaining brand image and intense competition among sellers of footwear for consumers; anticipating, identifying, interpreting or forecasting changes in fashion trends, consumer demand for the products and the various market factors described above; sales levels during the spring, back-to-school and holiday selling seasons; and other factors referenced or incorporated by reference in the Company’s quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the three months ended March 31, 2015. The risks included here are not exhaustive. The Company operates in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment. New risks emerge from time to time and the companies cannot predict all such risk factors, nor can the companies assess the impact of all such risk factors on their respective businesses or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements. Given these risks and uncertainties, you should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements as a prediction of actual results. Moreover, reported results should not be considered an indication of future performance.
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CLIFTON PARK, NY — Name Bubbles, makers of award-winning labels and gifts, has fulfilled a pledge made last year to charity partner K.I.D.S. (Kids in Distressed Situations), donating $25,000 to the national organization. The company, which made the announcement as part of their month-long fifth-anniversary celebration, raised the money through sales of its personalized clothing labels. This year-long drive was the focus of Name Bubbles’ 2013 GIVE program, an annual effort to give back to child-oriented charitable organizations. The program is spearheaded by Founder and CEO Michelle Brandriss.

“This is yet another reason we love our customers so much,” stated Brandriss. “With the help of their purchases towards laundry-safe clothing labels, we were able to donate $1 of every product purchased to K.I.D.S. We feel extremely lucky to have been given the opportunity to donate to such a wonderful organization and make a difference in children’s lives.”

On January 14, a group of Name Bubbles representatives volunteered at Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital under New York Presbyterian as part of the K.I.D.S. hospital program network partner, Princess For A Lifetime, and helped create a magical moment for resident children and their families. “We are so honored to have been the recipient of Name Bubbles’ GIVE 2013 program,” says Denise Durham-Williams, President of K.I.D.S. “We thank Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital for hosting this event and enabling K.I.D.S. to give these generous donors a glimpse of how their fund-raising efforts affect families and children on a more meaningful, personal level,” she adds.

Name Bubbles has said that they will continue the GIVE Program in 2014 and will be rolling out new opportunities to participate and donate to an organization in need later this year.

About Name Bubbles

Name Bubbles is a leading manufacturer of waterproof name-labels and other gifts. Awarded the Parent Tested, Parent Approved seal of approval, winner of the prestigious iParenting Award for Outstanding Products, and named Best School Supply in the SheKnows Parenting Awards 2012, the company produces durable dishwasher and laundry safe press-and-stick name labels and personalized gifts to help busy families keep track of belongings. Custom label packs and gifts are available online and can be created and purchased directly at NameBubbles.com.

CONTACT:

Courtney Rauch
518-406-5460 x111
crauch@namebubbles.com

NEW YORK, December 11, 2013 – The popular stuffed animal company Squishable and non-profit organization Kids in Distressed Situations (K.I.D.S.) have teamed up to bring holiday hugs to children in need, with the help of some round, fuzzy and lovable stuffed animals. For every Mini Baby Dolphin (http://cud.li/squishdolphin) purchased during this holiday season, Squishable will be donating a similar stuffed animal to a child in need through K.I.D.S. (http://cud.li/givecuddles).

The Buy-One-Give-One (BOGO) Mini Baby Dolphin campaign is a continuation of the kick-off that took place on Squishable’s entire website on Black Friday, where every single purchase of a Squishable led to a Squishable donation. The 2013 campaign has so far led to the donation of over 1,200 stuffed animals to children dealing with hardships such as poverty, disasters, and parents in military service this holiday season. The Mini Baby Dolphin BOGO will continue until the end of this year.

Squishable BOGO started in 2012, when fans requested that Squishable donate stuffed animals to help out families affected by Hurricane Sandy. In total Squishable donated 2,682 Squishables in 2012. This year Squishable will continue its partnership with K.I.D.S.—an award-winning nonprofit that is recognized by the Better Business Bureau, Charity Navigator, and Forbes as one of the highest ranked and most efficient charities in America. Squishable is optimistic that the total number of donations this year will exceed the previous number.

Baby Dolphin designer Kendra Wells, whose instructions were to make the charity-intended Mini “insanely cute,” hopes that this Squishable, in conjunction with the charitable spirit of Buy-One-Give-One will “trigger warm fuzzies that will make it hard to resist helping someone out. It’s baby blue. It’s round. It’s fuzzy. It’s huggable. And it’s smiling! I think it’s going to be great.” Early results call for optimism, especially since some purchasers are specifically requesting that both their “buy one” and their “give one” be donated.

Squishable has a history of commitment to charity, consistently engaging in various philanthropic endeavors. All stuffed animal prototypes are donated to the Stephen D. Hassenfeld Children’s Center for Cancer & Blood Disorders in New York City, and monthly donations are made to charities suggested by their fans. One-of-a-kind squishables and art are occasionally even auctioned off on eBay to benefit Charities. For more information visit http://www.squishable.com/s/charity.

Media Contact:

Zoe Fraade
Tel: 410-419-8183
Email: Zoe@squishable.com

Great-Grandmother Gets to Make Thanksgiving Dinner at Home!

November 27, 2013 (New York, NY) – Betty Robinson lives in the Rockaways section of Queens, NY and moved out of her home after it was damaged by Hurricane Sandy more than a year ago. Today she realized a Thanksgiving blessing as she got to see her completely renovated house for the first time, including new furniture and decorations. Kids in Distressed Situations (K.I.D.S.) and The Legacy Center (TLC) are working together to renovate Betty’s house and three more, using funds donated to K.I.D.S. for Sandy relief.

In January 2013, TLC and K.I.D.S. began to work on a plan to help local families affected by the Hurricane Sandy. Having witnessed TLC’s success with their early remodeled homes, K.I.D.S. is providing them with a $160,000 grant to help gut, remodel and furnish the interior of a minimum of four homes in the hardest hit areas in New York City. Betty’s house is on Beach 46th Street in the Rockaway’s section of Queens, NY; the remaining houses will also be New York residents and will be identified by TLC over the next several months.

Homeowner Betty Robinson and her husband were already planning to renovate their house, when her husband died early in 2013 a few months after the storm. As the guardian to her two great-grandchildren, Betty has had a difficult time, renting a temporary apartment and trying to make a life for her family. Today, she is back in her fully furnished home, complete with a seasoned turkey in the refrigerator ready to cook for Thanksgiving dinner.

media-112713-release

(L to R) The Legacy Center’s Executive Director Jordan Durso and Operations Director Diana Denis, with homeowner Betty Robinson and K.I.D.S. President Denise Durham Williams, in Betty’s newly renovated and furnished bedroom.

“Recovering from a natural disaster takes time, and that’s why K.I.D.S. is committed to helping families for the long haul,” said K.I.D.S. President Denise Durham Williams. “Many people that we helped with new apparel, home fashions, toys and children’s products right after the storm were able to get their lives back on track quickly, but some people have more challenges and need more time and care. We’re happy to be able to help Betty and the children return to their home.”

“The opportunity to help people when they really need it the most is so rewarding,” says TLC Executive Director Jordan Durso. ‘We have renovated more than 10 houses of Sandy victims and each one of them is so grateful to return to their normal lives. The bottom line is that families really do need a house before they can make it a home.”

New York, N.Y. November 4, 2013 – Echo Design, a leading fashion and home accessories brand announces Share The Warmth, a charitable promotion that will launch on November 11th on www.echodesign.com. The promotion will benefit Fashion Delivers, a national non-profit organization dedicated to providing apparel and other products donated by manufacturers and retailers to community charities across the country.

Share the Warmth – Buy One, We Give Two. Starting November 11th through December 1, 2013 Echo Design invites consumers to purchase cold weather items, such as gloves, hats or mufflers from www.echodesign.com and for each unit sold, the company will donate two comparable items to those in need through Fashion Delivers. All the items donated will go to those in the northeast still impacted by the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, one year later. Echo Design wants to help ensure people keep warm this winter.

“Giving back has always been part of our 90 year heritage and this holiday season, we are proud to partner with Fashion Delivers. There is a need to continue to support communities affected by Hurricane Sandy and we hope to provide warmth in the cold months ahead by donating scarfs, hats and gloves to those in need.” Says Lynn Roberts, Vice President of Communications, Echo Design.

“Recovering from a natural disaster is a long, challenging road, which is why we are still working with New York and New Jersey charities to help people affected by Hurricane Sandy,” said Fashion Delivers Chairman Allan Ellinger. “This program is a great way for consumers to help people in need while also getting beautiful products. We’re counting on the generosity of companies like Echo Design, as well as their customers, to help keep people warm this winter.”

About Echo Design and The Echo Design Group 

Established in 1923, Echo Design is a leader in creating innovative and beautifully designed accessories and home products. The brand includes scarfs, handbags, cold weather items, gloves, outerwear, beachwear and tech accessories. Echo Design home collections consist of bedding, bath products, decorative fabric and trim, wallcoverings, rugs, and tabletop. These products are distributed globally. With each new line, Echo Design brings the same timeless values of quality, craftsmanship and integrity.

The Echo Design Group designs extensive collections through private label for major brands and retailers, prominent museums such as MoMA and Art Institute of Chicago, and through its longstanding licensing relationship with the Ralph Lauren family of brands.

Press Contact: 

Kimberly Flaster, HL Group: kflaster@hlgrp.com 

Stacie Gillian, HL Group: sgillian@hlgrp.com 

Zeba Rashid, HL Group: zrashid@hlgrp.com

Help spread warmth with the Warm Coats and Warm Hearts Coat Drive

BURLINGTON, NJ, November 1, 2013 – Burlington, a national off-price retailer offering designer
merchandise at everyday low prices, will launch its seventh annual Warm Coats and Warm Hearts Coat
Drive on Friday, November 1, 2013. The coat drive benefits Fashion Delivers, a national non-profit
organization dedicated to providing apparel and other products donated by manufacturers and retailers
to community charities across the U.S. and throughout the world. To date, more than 1.2 million
coats have been distributed through the Warm Coats and Warm Hearts program.

The theme of this year’s coat drive is “Style Is Giving, Share the Warmth with Others.” It invites
consumers to donate gently-worn coats at drop boxes at Burlington locations nationwide. Coats should
be in good condition, with working closures and no rips or stains. As a thank you, those who donate will
receive 10 percent off their entire purchase at Burlington through January 20, 2014. In addition, any
customer who purchases a Coca-Cola product and joins My Coke Rewards, will be able to donate their
points to Fashion Delivers to help fund the purchase of new coats for people in need.

“Giving back to local communities is a priority for Burlington, especially during the holiday season when
so many are in need,” said Thomas Kingsbury, president and chief executive officer of Burlington. “We
are thrilled that the Warm Coats and Warm Hearts Coat Drive allows us to spread the warmth nationwide
during the cold winter months by providing coats to people in need in communities surrounding our local
stores.”
ABC’s Emmy Award-winning news program, Good Morning America, will be helping to promote the
program via an on-air coat drive kicking off on November 14, 2013. The effort will help remind its
millions of viewers about the ongoing need for coats all across the country, and demonstrate how people
can help each and every day. Customers are asked to share stories and Tweet a selfie of them donating a
coat and using #WarmCoats for their chance to have their selfie on Good Morning America. Customers
who donate a large quantity of coats and share their stories with #WarmCoats may be selected to appear
in a coat makeover segment on Good Morning America.

“We are proud to partner with Burlington on the Warm Coats and Warm Hearts program for the seventh
year. This program allows us to show our commitment to helping people across the nation give to those
in need through the donation of coats. Each year we are inspired by the good this program does and the
people it touches,” said Tom Cibrowski, senior executive producer, Good Morning America.
“We are thrilled to join Burlington on the Warm Coats and Warm Hearts program,” said Allan Ellinger,
chairman of Fashion Delivers. “The partnership allows us to deliver desperately needed coats to people
nationwide through 269 community charities. This effort really makes a difference to those in need; it’s amazing what the gift of just one coat can do.”
For more information and to find a list of participating Burlington stores visit www.BurlingtonCoatFactory.com.

Media Contact:
Bari Kurzman
M Booth
(212) 539-3288
barik@mbooth.com

By Muhammed El-Hasan, Daily Breeze

Posted: 09/18/13, 5:41 PM PDT

Hidden inside a nondescript beige building in Redondo Beach — with no sign outside — workers at a bustling online fashion retailer ship clothes, handbags and jewelry to customers around the world.

Since launching three years ago, Modnique has expanded rapidly through intensive marketing, word of mouth and, recently, buying another company’s assets.

When Modnique purchased New York-based Totsy in June, the South Bay company was mostly interested in acquiring the other business’s email list of customers, including expecting mothers and parents.

As for Totsy’s $2 million in inventory, Modnique decided to donate it in part because it did not fit the company’s brand.

Modnique gave the women’s, children’s and baby apparel as well as books, toys, shoes and home goods to Kids In Distressed Situations, known as K.I.D.S., a New York charity that gives to children who suffer from poverty and natural disasters worldwide.

“We don’t always get a chance to make a dent in our communities in this way,” Modnique CEO and co-founder Einaras von Gravrock said of the donation.

K.I.D.S.’s international focus also fits well with Modnique’s worldwide reach, von Gravrock said.

“This amount is certainly large by our standards and will benefit needy children served by our wide network of community partners,” said Edgar Trinidad, spokesman for the charity, in an email. “Our charitable model is based on distributing new products that are essential to children in need.

The donation coincided with the company’s launch of Modnique Kids, which is a rebranded version of Totsy.

Modnique was founded in 2010 in Playa Vista. Last year, the company moved into two adjacent buildings in Redondo Beach, where about 160 people run executive, marketing and distribution operations.

The company has another 150 employees who work out of locations in Lithuania, Moldova and Panama. More than half of Modnique’s customers are outside the United States.

Through its website, www.modnique.com, the private company serves as an online fashion liquidator, selling mostly new products supplied directly from the brands.

“We allow their liquidation of merchandise internationally,” said von Gravrock, 29, of Redondo Beach. “It’s not 5 years old, but it might be a couple seasons old.”

Most of Modnique’s revenue comes from “events,” which are sales of certain products lasting a certain period of time. The company sends out emails daily to notify customers about the events.

“We do it fast. It might take two or three days,” von Gravrock said. “It gives the flexibility for the brand to move on. If it’s not selling, we don’t have to wait a month.”

While von Gravrock declined to provide revenue figures, the company’s growth has been obvious: In its first month of operation in February 2010, it had eight events,; last month, there were 500 events for such products as skirts, shoes and jewelry.

Including Totsy’s more than 3 million customers, Modnique now has a list of about 5 million emails. The company emails 1 million customers a day about new events.

One of the challenges Modnique faces is how to integrate the new customers and market to “Totsy’s moms,” said Katherine Pepka, Modnique’s marketing coordinator of email and social media.

While promoting itself online, Modnique tries to keep a low profile in the physical world. That is why the company has no sign on its headquarters building, von Gravrock said.

In one part of the warehouse, where packages are waiting to be shipped to destinations as diverse as Texas, Mexico, Philippines and Brunei, a guard uses a metal detector to check employees at the door.

“We don’t want to take chances,” von Gravrock said.

The company’s next major step will come in October, when it will launch localized websites for specific countries and regions. Currently, the website is all in English.

“The first one we’re going to launch is Russian,” von Gravrock said. “Russia is the biggest e-commerce country in Europe. It’s 7 percent of our business by world of mouth.”

Modnique’s international flavor includes its leadership and name. Von Gravrock is a Lithuanian native, who became an American citizen. Some of his partners also are from foreign countries.

And Modnique is a play on the Russian word for “fashionista.”

Yet, the company’s founders chose to start in Southern California. That is because of the region’s vast talent pool in technology and fashion, von Gravrock said.

“There’s few places around the world where you can find this kind of creativity here in Los Angeles, in the South Bay,” he said. “That’s why so many companies start in Los Angeles.”

By David Moin Women’s Wear Daily August 29, 2013

KIDS ROCK: Kids of celebrities get their moment on the runway during New York Fashion Week, when Haddad Brands stages the first Kids Rock show in Grand Central Terminal, inside Vanderbilt Hall, on Sept. 11, at 6 p.m. “We’ve never done a fashion show during fashion week. There will be a lot of athletes and celebrities and their kids,” said a spokesman for Haddad, the New York-based children’s apparel and accessories licensee for several leading brands.

Thaddeus Ann, the daughter of Kelly Bensimon; Jeffrey Tarpley, son of Sherri Shepherd; Lil C, Jaden, Cyia and Carter, the children of New York Yankee CC Sabathia, and Amar’e Jr., Assata and Ar’e, the children of New York Knick Amar’e Stoudemire, will be on the catwalk “wearing the latest trends — varsity jackets, neon T-shirts, printed denim jeans, graphic backpacks and headwear and accessories from Levi’s, Converse, Jordan and Nike,” the spokesman said. Fern Mallis helped organize the event which will be hosted by Stoudemire. The brands will donate products to the Amar’e Stoudemire Foundation and Kids in Distressed Situations. 

The Huffington Post  |  By Nader Salass 08/21/2013 9:47 am EDT

It’s back-to-school time, which means kids are savoring those last moments of the summer and parents are doing that mad dash through the aisles for supplies, gadgets and jeans with price tags that might make them wince.

But not all families have the luxury of choosing which tablet to buy their students — or even affording loose-leaf paper in some cases. Many families are living off one income, might not know where there next meal is coming from or have been displaced by a recent disaster. And that’s where nonprofits — and you — come in.

Supporting kids in need ensures their basic needs are met so that they can focus on learning, Catherine Meek, the executive director of tutoring and educational support nonprofit Schools On Wheels, said in a recent piece for the Huffington Post:

“How can a seven-year-old child learn when she has not slept the night before because she’s scared and hungry and doesn’t know where she’ll sleep that night? How can we expect a 15-year-old to care about graduating when he has to study in a closet because the shelter lights have been turned off?”

Show your back-to-school spirit by checking out the organizations below and finding out how you can help kids in need empower themselves.

 

Help Displaced Students:
Kids In Distressed Situations (K.I.D.S)
K.I.D.S collaborates with partner corporations to raise funds and organize volunteer work for helping provide children who experience extreme economic and domestic hardship with financial, medical, and education support. K.I.D.S reports that it has delivered over $6 million in school supplies and clothing to children in need since 1998. The organization also provides relief to children and parents suffering from the aftermath of natural disasters. To learn more about how you can help out, click here.

WDAY News August 01, 2013, 04:33 PM

Fargo, ND (WDAY TV) — Toys, not food, invaded the Great Plains Food Bank in Fargo today.

The Great Plains Food Bank teamed up with both the Toy Industry Foundation and Kids in Distressed Situations group to help package and distribute Dragon pillow pets along with various other donated toys.

The toys are being distributed to the 264 partner agencies of the Great Plains Food Bank where they will then be unpackaged and handed out to kids throughout all 50 states.

Steve Sellent, Director of the Great Plains Food Bank, says, “kids absolutely love getting toys, but I think for you know kids in low income families that don’t have many, sometimes no toys you know it’s a really special thing and for us it’s just another way to touch lives of those children in a very positive and meaningful way.”

This year is marked the tenth anniversary of the Toy Bank drive.

Sioux City Journal  •  July 21, 2013 4:00 pm  •  ALLY KARSYN akarsyn@siouxcityjournal.com

The four founders of a charity-driven clothing store wanted to #MovetheMovement.

In a few weeks, they’re taking it all the way to the West Coast.

Sergeant Bluff natives Jake Thomas, Jerid Schumacher, Taylor Grote and Levi Maxfield have been selected to attend the Fourth Estate Leadership Summit, hosted by Invisible Children at UCLA from Aug. 8-11.

“What we stand for is those small acts of kindness that create big movements,” Thomas said. “We didn’t think it would take off this fast.”

Widespread Threads, founded by four University of Iowa students in April, has a mission to make a change – one T-shirt at a time. Or maybe that should say two.

The clothing company matches each purchase with a donation to Kids in Distressed Situations, a non-profit organization that provides essential products to children and teens affected by poverty.

For each T-shirt sold, Widespread Threads gives one to a child in need.

“If you make an impact on someone when they’re young, that carries throughout their life,” Schumacher said.

The movement is on the move.

At the four-day conference in Los Angeles, the Widespread Threads crew will have the opportunity to network with other young community leaders and learn new skills through hands-on workshops.

The leadership summit strives to help students and educators make a difference in their own communities and around the world.

But before they make their big trip, they have a few packages to deliver.

More than 300 brand new child-size T-shirts will be given away Aug. 3 at an event put on by Boone County CARES, which is part of the K.I.D.S. network.

“There’s a lot of kids out there that don’t have the same head start as other kids do,” Schumacher said.

The Widespread movement comes from small beginnings.

About a year ago, Thomas and Schumacher started selling wristbands for charity, but they wanted to make more of an impact.

It didn’t take long for them to land on T-shirts.

They formed a business plan and applied to participate in the Bedell Entrepreneurship Learning Laboratory, a program at the University of Iowa dedicated to helping student entrepreneurs.

Widespread Threads is one of nearly 20 businesses in the program.

The wristbands are still a part of what they do.

Movement Bandz help raise money for the Silver Lining fund, which benefits the University of Iowa Children’s Hospital, and the Kokua fund.

Thomas explained the Hawaiian word succinctly, saying Kokua means “to give without expecting anything in return.”

The fund was created to encourage random acts of kindness in the community. Wherever that is.

Widespread Threads has an office in Iowa City, Iowa, but the founders didn’t forget their Siouxland roots.

Currently, proceeds from the Kokua wristbands benefit two children, Ross Gengler and Jacey Ball, both of Sergeant Bluff. He has cancer. She has leukemia.

The founders say their company isn’t just a clothing line. It’s a lifestyle.

And it carries a message.

“When you give, you receive tenfold,” Thomas said.

Posted Jun 26, 2013 | The Joester Loria Group

On June 6, Kids in Distressed Situations (K.I.D.S) and Fashion Delivers hosted the Women of Achievement luncheon honoring four women who have made wonderful contributions to our community. Our very own Debra Joester, a K.I.D.S. Board Member, and Joanne Loria were in attendance as a show of The Joester Loria Group’s ongoing support for the organization.  The luncheon was the first joint event hosted by K.I.D.S and Fashion Delivers, who formally announced the upcoming merger of the two organizations, scheduled to occur in the next few months.

The women honored at the luncheon included Maura Regan, senior vice president and general manager of global consumer products for Sesame Workshop and LIMA Board Chairwoman, Margaret Hayes, chief executive officer of Fashion Group International; Joanne Podell, vice chairman of retail services for Cushman & Wakefield; and Kelly Neal Mariotti, ceo of First Candle. The event raised more than $200,000 for the charities.

The Joester Loria Group looks forward to continuing our work with K.I.D.S. as they begin their new partnership with Fashion Delivers.

Images from the event are available on Guest of a Guest.

MRketplace June 14, 2013 by MRketplace Staff 

Kids In Distressed Situations (K.I.D.S.) and Fashion Delivers held their seventh annual Women In Industry Luncheon at Cipriani 42nd St. on June 6, raising more than $200,000. The event introduced the, Denise Durham Williams, the new president of K.I.D.S., and honored Margaret Hayes, president of Fashion Group International; Kelly Neal Mariotti, CEO of First Candle; Joanne Podell of Cushman & Wakefield and Maura Regan of Sesame Workshop.

A portion of the money raised at the luncheon will go directly to the support of those affected by the recent Oklahoma tornadoes.

View images from the event here

The Toy Book JUNE 10, 2013 BY ALI MIERZEJEWSKI

The seventh annual Women In Industry Luncheon raised more than $200,000 on June 6 to benefit Kids In Distressed Situations(K.I.D.S.) and Fashion Delivers Charitable Foundation Inc., partner charities that have provided more than $1 billion in new product donations to families impacted by poverty and natural disasters.  The event, held at Cipriani 42 St. in New York City, introduced Denise Durham Williams as the new president and CEO of K.I.D.S. and honored Margaret Hayes, president of Fashion Group International; Kelly Neal Mariotti, CEO of First Candle; Joanne Podell, vice chairman, retail services, Cushman & Wakefield; and Maura Regan, senior vice president and general manager, global consumer products, Sesame Workshop.  NY1 News journalist Jessica Abo was the emcee. A portion of the proceeds raised by the event will support the charities’ relief efforts for families affected by the recent Oklahoma tornadoes.

Women’s Wear Daily By JEAN E. PALMIERI

The missions of Kids in Distressed Situations and Fashion Delivers are similar: Both charities work to provide product to children and families in need. So it’s no surprise the two organizations are planning a merger.

At a dual Women of Achievement luncheon at Cipriani last Thursday, Allan Ellinger, chairman of Fashion Delivers, flanked by Kevin Burke, chairman of K.I.D.S., told the group that the charities expect to formally combine within the next several months. Ellinger told WWD later that although both boards have voted unanimously for a merger, the final approval must come from the Attorney General of New York State. “Everything indicates that we’ll get it done,” he said.

On Thursday, the spotlight was on four women who have made a difference through their professional and philanthropic endeavors. The luncheon honored Margaret Hayes, chief executive officer of Fashion Group International; Joanne Podell, vice chairman of retail services for Cushman & Wakefield; Maura Regan, senior vice president and general manager of global consumer products for Sesame Workshop, and Kelly Neal Mariotti, ceo of First Candle.

Surrounded by their families and friends, the four took the time to highlight the work of the two organizations and urge attendees to continue to support their efforts. Regan said there are “too many children going without the basics they need to succeed.” Podell said that by providing needy families with new apparel and other products, “we’re telling young children and their families that they matter.” Hayes, whose award was presented by designers Isabel and Ruben Toledo, said the charities “bring a rebirth of confidence and self-esteem” to those they help. Mariotti, who left a career as a corporate lawyer to helm a national nonprofit organization dedicated to safe pregnancies and the survival of babies through the first years of life, urged attendees to volunteer their time as well as their financial support to help others and leave behind a legacy of which they can be proud.

The luncheon, which raised $200,000 for the charities, also served to introduce the new president of K.I.D.S., Denise Williams.

Earnshaw’s Posted on Jun 3, 2013

Charitable organizations Fashion Delivers and Kids in Distressed Situations (K.I.D.S.) are calling on manufacturers and retailers to donate new products to help those affected by the twister that tore through the Oklahoma City suburbs, killing at least 24 people. Working together, the two organizations are assessing needs on the ground and reaching out to corporate partners to provide new clothing, including T-shirts, jeans, underwear, socks and rubber-soled shoes, as well as blankets, sheets, towels, diapers, hygiene products and furnishings for families. “Fashion Delivers and Kids in Distressed Situations are doing what we do best, mobilizing the manufacturing and retail communities to reach out and help those in need through the donation of new products,” said Fashion Delivers Chairman Allan Ellinger. “As we receive donations, we are preparing to immediately ship them to our community partners in the hardest hit areas.”

Those interested in donating new product or money to help Fashion Delivers and K.I.D.S. with the tornado recovery efforts should visit www.kidsdonations.org or www.fashiondelivers.org, or call 646-786- 2680 or 212-279-5493.

South Fulton Neighbor By Nneka Okona

A joint partnership between Caring for Others, a nonprofit based in south Fulton, and Delta Children, a New York-based family-owned business, made possible both a safe sleep seminar and a crib giveaway to 130 families last week.

The business donated about $60,000 in cribs to families in need, those who were registered and pre-qualified by the nonprofit as recipients.

This is the first year both the seminar and the crib giveaway have been done.

Eslene Richmond-Shockley, nonprofit president and founder, said the program was most certainly a buffer for those who needed it most in the community.

“Not everyone can afford the basic necessities,” she said.

The program, which started at noon on May 21, began with a 15-minute seminar on child safety, focusing on sleep safety.

Richmond-Shockley said the seminar was undoubtedly the most important part of the event.

“We don’t know which child from these families could be the next president, school teacher, firefighter or police officer,” she said. “If we could save that child to become the thing they could be, what a great thing to do.”

Joseph Shamie, president of the business, agreed.

“This is an ongoing effort and commitment on our part to educate parents nationwide on the importance for safe sleeping conditions for their children,” he said. “As a father myself, I don’t sleep at night unless I know our babies are safe in our cribs.”

Immediately following the seminar, the cribs were distributed with much gratitude from the families, Richmond-Shockley said.

“People were very, very grateful and thankful,” she said. “There was one lady that didn’t have transportation because someone had promised to come and get her. She began to cry because she was so grateful to receive the crib and didn’t want to lose it.”

Chris Blake, president of Kids in Distressed Situations, represented the nonprofit that connected the two groups.

Shamie is a board member of KIDS, which has provided more than $1 billion worth of brand new clothing, shoes, toys, books, baby products and more to 70 million children in need throughout the U.S. and overseas.

Fashion Delivers Charitable Foundation and Kids In Distressed Situations are calling on manufacturers and retailers to donate essential new products to help people affected by last week’s tornado in Oklahoma.

Fashion Delivers and K.I.D.S. are assessing needs on the ground in Moore, Oklahoma, and reaching out to corporate partners for the greatest needs: new clothing including t-shirts, jeans, underwear, socks and rubber-soled shoes, blankets, sheets, towels, diapers, hygiene products and furnishings for families.

“Fashion Delivers and Kids in Distressed Situations are doing what we do best, mobilizing the manufacturing and retail communities to reach out and help those in need through the donation of new products,” said Fashion Delivers Chairman Allan Ellinger. “As we receive donations, we are preparing to immediately ship them to our community partners in the hardest hit areas.”

Both Fashion Delivers and K.I.D.S. are supporting the following community partners providing tornado relief efforts on the ground: Operation Compassion, Operation Homefront Oklahoma, Infant Parent Intervention Center, Comanche Nation Higher Education Programs, Food and Shelter For Friends, Midwest Military Outreach and Operation Homefront Missouri and HEROES Care.

“We have reached out to our regular donors as well as other companies, and we are ready to receive and stage product donations,” said K.I.D.S. Chairman Kevin Burke. “We invite our corporate merchandise partners to help us bring hope to families in Oklahoma with donations of new product.”

Companies that have already made their initial product donations include: Aéropostale, apparel; Angelwish, personal hygiene products; BOBS from Skechers, children’s shoes; Delta Childrens, cribs; Doneger Group, apparel; Exxel, sleeping bags; For Bare Feet, socks; Free People, apparel; Fruit of the Loom, underwear; Gerber Childrenswear, apparel; JC’S Closet, apparel; Jones Group, shoes; KidCuteTure, apparel; Lacoste, footwear; Newell Rubbermaid, cribs; One Stop Kid Shop, apparel; Parigi Group, apparel; Perry Ellis, apparel; Rachel Roy, apparel; ROAM, apparel; Submarine Swimsuits, apparel; and Vitamin Shoppe, nutrition bars and water. Additionally, our nonprofit partner Caring For Others has donated men’s shirts and dinnerware, and Variety – The Children’s Charity has donated apparel.

If you would like to donate new product or money to help Fashion Delivers and K.I.D.S. with the tornado recovery efforts, please visit either website or call: www.fashiondelivers.org, 646-786- 2680 or www.kidsdonations.org, 212-279-5493.

The Wave

Responding to the continuing post-storm needs of young people in Rockaway, Kids In Distressed Situations (K.I.D.S.) and SnowSports Industries America (SIA) recently held a free sneaker giveaway event at the Queens Library for Teens in Far Rockaway.

Nearly 300 children, teens and adults chose new shoes. The donation was intended to give support to communities in the Rockaways that were badly affected by Superstorm Sandy and where families are still struggling to recover.

One 15 year old said “OMG, I never got two pairs of sneakers at the same time in my life.”

A 16 year old who lost everything in Hurricane Sandy said: “This is the first pair of new sneakers that I got since the Hurricane.”

According to organizers, the SIA’s donation was meant to give kids and their families, tangible proof that better days are coming.

The event followed the Friday, May 10th, distribution of thousands of items of winter apparel donated by SIA and its member companies at the Far Rockaway library branch. It continues K.I.D.S.’ ongoing relief efforts for the families six months after Hurricane Sandy hit.

Immediately after the storm, K.I.D.S. staged product drives and holiday parties to distribute toys and other gifts to thousands of children, giving away more than $5 million of merchandise to brighten their holidays.

K.I.D.S. was founded in 1985 with the mission of providing new kid-essentials to children and teens who have been impacted by poverty and tragedy. Since its inception, K.I.D.S has provided almost $1 billion to help nearly 70 million children.

SIA is a non-profit member-owned trade association that works year-round with North American snow sports suppliers, retailers, reports, reps and service providers to develop products and programs that support individual and collective business needs.

Beauty News NYC By Sarabeth Blum

The massive tornado that tore through Oklahoma City, OK last Monday killed at least 24 people – nine of whom were children – and left hundreds more injured and homeless. Thanks to the combined efforts of Fashion Delivers Charitable Foundation and Kids in Distressed Situations (K.I.D.S.), Inc., brands of the fashion, home, and children’s industries are stepping forward to donate new clothing, hygiene and furnishing products to the tornado victims in the hardest hit areas of Oklahoma City.

We would like to sincerely thank those who have already made their initial donations to the Oklahoma Tornado relief efforts:
Thus far, clothing items have been donated by Aéropostale, BOBS from Skechers, Doneger Group, For Bare Feet, Fruit of the Loom, Free People, Gerber Childrenswear, JC’S Closet, Jones Group, KidCuteTure, Lacoste, One Stop Kid Shop, Parigi Group, Perry Ellis, Rachel Roy, ROAM, and Submarine Swimsuits.
Personal hygiene and food products have been donated by Angelwish and The Vitamin Shoppe; furnishings have been donated by Delta Childrens, Exxel and Newell Rubbermaid.
Thank you all for bringing hope and help to the Oklahoma families left hurt, homeless, and in need.
If you would like to donate new product or money to help Fashion Delivers and K.I.D.S. with the
tornado recovery efforts, please visit either website or call: http://www.fashiondelivers.org, 646-786-
2680 or http://www.kidsdonations.org, 212-279-5493.

Tampa Bay Times By Megan Hussey, Times Correspondent Saturday, April 27, 2013 4:30am

A few years ago, staff and PTA members at Seven Oaks Elementary in Wesley Chapel noticed that some students were unable to participate in the yearly Scholastic Book Fair.

“It was so sad,” said Charla Palmer, media specialist at Seven Oaks Elementary. “Teachers didn’t want kids who couldn’t buy books to be embarrassed, so they’d sometimes ask them to stay back in the classroom during the book fair. Other kids were told they could just look at the books.”

Three years ago, Palmer joined forces with the PTA to make sure that no Seven Oaks student would leave the book fair empty handed.

“The PTA felt that if a child was not able to participate in the fair, then we should ensure that every child who wants a book, gets a book,” said Ana DaSilva-Bernie, PTA president.

Getting involved with Scholastic Book Fairs’ national All for Books program, Seven Oaks Elementary this year raised $2,418 toward the purchase of 970 books from Scholastic. That’s one book for every child at the school. Through this program, schools generate funds for the purchase of books for their disadvantaged students. For every dollar raised, Scholastic donates one book to an organization that helps needy children around the world.

Due to this year’s Seven Oaks Books for All donation, facilitated through PTA fundraisers that include family movie nights and cookie dough sales, 2,400 books will be sent to the Kids In Need Foundation and Kids in Distressed Situations Inc.

“We want the kids to understand the great need in our own community,” said Danielle Biggs, treasurer of the Seven Oaks PTA as well as a teacher and parent at the school.

The free books, handpicked by Palmer and PTA members, were delivered to the students last week in their classrooms.

“As a teacher, I see the benefits of reading to my students,” Biggs said. “As a parent, I see how excited my kids are when they get free books.”

And, according to Denise Nicholas, first vice president of the Seven Oaks PTA, that’s the whole point.

“We do all this for the kids,” she said. “They’re the ones who really matter.”

Kids at Northwest Elementary in Hudson also are learning the value of reading and giving the gift of literacy.

Northwest students recently sent 410 books to students in Papua New Guinea as part of the school’s yearly participation in the OCHO Project: Read for a Need. In this program, now in its fifth year at Northwest, students pledge to read eight books to earn three to five free books that they can select at a schoolwide book fair. After the kids enjoy these books over the summer, school counselor Lisa Peart asks them to bring back the books to be donated to needy kids across the world, in areas such as Africa, India, Vietnam — and this year, Papua New Guinea, a Pacific island nation that has a 56 percent literacy rate.

“When I first learned about the OCHO Project: Read for a Need, I thought it would be great for our school because I knew many of our students did not have books of their own at home to read,” Peart said. “At the first OCHO free book fair, the students were so excited and could not believe the books were free!”

Peart said this project carries long-term benefits for Northwest students.

“During the school year, our students have access to a ton of books in our library, but over the summer some families do not have access or transportation to the public library and a lot of students do not have many books at home,” she said. “That is why we hold the free book fair the week before school is out, so that we ensure that every student is going home with three to five books so they can keep reading over the summer.”

And they learn to give back.

Children’s author Marilyn Perlyn, creator of the OCHO Project, travels to member countries to deliver the books. She sends photos and stories from her trips to Peart, who shares the tales and images of life in Papua New Guinea with the students at Northwest.

“Our students get to come to a school with a beautiful library and advanced technology like iPods and iPads for them to use,” Peart said. “Some of the schools we have donated books to in other countries don’t even have electricity or any books at their school, and seeing this helps our students appreciate all that they do have.

“The greatest moment is when I show the students pictures from the other countries and they recognize a book they donated in the hands of a student half way across the world!”

New York, NY, April 22, 2013 – Kids In Distressed Situations (K.I.D.S.), a global children’s charity and disaster relief organization, today announced it has passed the $1 billion mark in charitable deliveries of child-essential products and apparel to support children in need since its founding in 1985. The benchmark was celebrated this week at a meeting of the K.I.D.S. executive committee, whose members include executives from leading children’s products companies such as Gerber Childrenswear, Carter’s and Toys “R” Us, among others.

The occasion comes as K.I.D.S. introduces initiatives that broaden its advocacy work in the wake of its lauded disaster-relief efforts in several communities throughout New York and New Jersey devastated by Hurricane Sandy in November 2012. K.I.D.S. became a central player in the recovery efforts, spearheading the speedy delivery of product donations from companies within its network from all areas of children’s product manufacturing and retailing.

In January, K.I.D.S. rolled out a SIDS education initiative, establishing in Los Angeles, with Delta Children’s Products, the first of ten Safe Sleep Centers planned for rollout throughout the United States in 2013.

Most recently, K.I.D.S. implemented G.I.R.L.S. (Girls In Real-Life Situations) a girl empowerment component to its ongoing product donation deliveries by spotlighting local social service agencies and organizations that support girls with product and access to education and self-improvement programs.

“This milestone reminds us to look back with a grateful heart to the over 5,000 companies who have donated excess inventory to K.I.D.S. programs in our 27- year history,” said K.I.D.S. Chairman of the Board Kevin Burke. “It also reminds us to look forward. The current economic climate, the increasing frequency of natural disasters and reduction in public spending means that the work of K.I.D.S. is more important than ever.”

K.I.D.S. is recognized by the Better Business Bureau, Charity Navigator and Forbes as one of the highest ranked and most efficient charities in America. Consumers Digest ranks K.I.D.S. as the #1 humanitarian charity in the United States. K.I.D.S.

K.I.D.S. converts every $10 cash donation into $100 worth of new product. Individuals, companies and organizations interested in supporting K.I.D.S.’ philanthropic programs through monetary donations, inventory donations or volunteering can visitwww.kidsdonations.org

Toms River Patch – Posted by Edward Van Embden 04/20/2013

Fashion Delivers teamed up with local organizations to hand out approximately $1.2 million in clothing and supplies to Hurricane Sandy victims.

The immediate needs of post-Hurricane Sandy recovery have largely been met. Residents have found temporary shelter, have made it through the winter thanks to donations of food and other supplies, and progress towards rebuilding lives continues every day.

But that doesn’t mean that there’s no longer a need.

On Saturday, Fashion Delivers, along with several other local volunteers organizations, distributed $1.2 million worth of shoes, toys, and clothing to residents still struggling to recovery following Sandy. The effort is part of the second stage of Sandy relief, which seeks to meet the changing needs of a prolonged recovery.

“The need is still there,” Peter Paris, marketing director for Fashion Delivers said. “Sandy victims have dealt with their immediate needs, but those who lost everything have to address the needs that come along with a new season.”

Paris said Fashion Delivers, along with its partner Kids in Distressed Situations, or KIDS, have worked to deliver supplies to Sandy victims beginning in November. In all, Paris said more than $43 million worth of merchandise, donated by a number of companies, has been distributed to the storm’s victims.

The distribution drive was hosted in the gymnasium of Toms River’s First United Methodist Church. Dozens of residents – the first of several hundred that would make their way through the numerous tables filled with blankets, pillows, toiletries, shoes, toys, and books – lined up outside of the building and waited for the doors to first open.

“It was emotional,” Terri Forbes, a volunteer and member of Boscov’s public relations, said. “These families, many of them with multiple children, they’re so very grateful. They’re very thankful.

“There were a lot of tears.”

Representatives from Boscov’s were on hand to measure children’s feet and hand out nearly 8,000 pairs of shoes donated to the Sandy relief effort by show manufacturer Skechers.

Though she was there to assist Sandy victims, Toni Barnett, store manager for Ocean County Boscov’s, said the emotional feelings went both ways.

“You feel privileged as well as honored to be able to help serve the people in your community,” she said.

The Toy Book APRIL 17, 2013 BY SIERRA MCCLEARY-HARRIS

Delta Children donated 200 new cribs—valued at $60,000—toPennsylvania United Medical Association (PUMA) in Warrington, Pa. The donation was made possible with the help of Kids in Distressed Situations(K.I.D.S), a non-profit organization that connects companies and children in need.

The Safe Sleep demonstration was held at PUMA, where Delta Children’s Co-President and K.I.D.S. Board Member Joseph Shamie stressed the importance of a safe crib and offered tips to the families.

K.I.D.S. implemented the distribution of the cribs on behalf of Delta Children to the families in need.

Libraries and bookstores were devastated by the storm; here’s what they’re doing to cope

On Monday, October 29, as Hurricane Sandy battered the East Coast, New Jersey’s swollen Shrewsbury River sent two feet of water into the Oceanport Public Library. “We were left with books in the middle of the floor,” says librarian Kate Hardy. “We lost the whole collection.” Because of mold and sewage, even not – so – soggy titles had to go – which meant the library lost 18,000 items worth $380,000. “At some level, the assumption is that all books, even if they’re not wet, are contaminated,” says Ken Sheinbaum, director of the 13 – branch Monmouth County Library system, which includes Oceanport. “We don’t want to give those books out to kids.” In his 41 years with the Monmouth County libraries, he says, “this is the first time we’ve ever closed for more than a day for an act of God.”

Hurricane Sandy wreaked havoc on libraries, schools, and bookstores throughout New York, New Jersey, Ohio, and Connecticut, and it hurt business at many more. Bibliophiles and publishing professionals stepped in to aid in the ongoing relief efforts. Random House (distributing through First Book, a nonprofit that provides books to children from low – income families) and Scholastic (distributing through Kids in Distressed Situations, a New York–based nonprofit that helps in – need families) are each donating a million books to schools and libraries in the hardest – hit areas. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt committed to donate 70,000 books through First Book, and Simon & Schuster offered to send any damaged school or library 500 popular titles and multiple copies of 20 new releases. So far 28 schools and libraries, plus a handful of other organizations, have received the S&S titles. And Dollar General Literacy Foundation (with the American Library Association, the American Association of School Librarians, and the National Education Association) is giving disaster – relief grants to help public school libraries replace books and other supplies.

From Hurricane Katrina, relief groups learned “not to rush it,” says Chandler Arnold, executive v – p of First Book. “There’s a hierarchy of need – clean water and warm space and food. Then very quickly, some groups [realized], ‘We do need stories for kids who are in temporary shelters.'” Libraries needed time to clean out mold and rebuild, he adds. “You don’t want to restock books with dampness there.”

To make sure mold and sewage water did not contaminate everything, four of the 62 Queens, N.Y., public libraries most severely hurt in the storm (three in the Rockaways and one in Broad Channel, which reopened last month) shipped books to the Allentown, Pa., facility of Rapid Refile, where high – efficiency vacuums sucked away residual matter. (Volumes in worse condition went through a bacteria – killing gamma – radiation machine.) That saved 50,000 books. But these four libraries had to discard some 100,000 others that were too soggy or waterlogged, or paperbacks that would be cheaper to replace than to preserve. With more valuable books, it was worthwhile to spend $1 to $2 each to decontaminate what looked normal to “the untrained eye,” says James Gilbert, v – p of Rapid Refile. “They’re basically ready to go now, but the buildings aren’t ready for them to come back. We have them in our climate – controlled storage.” One of the Rockaway libraries, the Arverne branch, filled with four-and-a-half feet of water and is currently operating out of a doublewide trailer, stuffed with about 2,000 books and 1,500 DVDs. The library lost about 80 percent of its collection, says Shakira Smalls, the jobs and youth counselor. At the Peninsula branch (operating out of a modular unit now), where surging water broke the glass entrance, “materials were actually floating out the door,” says chief operating officer Bridget Quinn – Carey. “After the water receded, there literally were books on the street, on the plaza.” At the East Rockaway Public Library, even after the power returned, staff members couldn’t turn on the heat because it would “speed up the process of mold growth,” says library director Elizabeth Charvat. Two weeks after Hurricane Sandy, outside remediation experts covered shelves with plastic wrap to protect the books from mold. The library reopened February 2.

In the Yonkers, N.Y., public library’s Riverfront branch, 300 books, which Disney – Hyperion donated when it moved from White Plains, N.Y., to Los Angeles, were awaiting cataloging when the storm hit, covering them with five feet of overflowing Hudson River water. The water also drenched 300 of the library’s summer – reading titles and classics.

The still – closed Island Park Public Library, in Nassau County, N.Y., filled with three feet of seawater and some sewage water, ruining the bottom two shelves of its first – floor stacks – where many children’s books were placed so kids could reach them. “We’ll never know how many items we lost because we didn’t have time to count,” says director Michelle Young, whose library remains closed. And because the storm was so unprecedented, she adds, “It’s not like anyone can say, ‘I know this kind of thing takes six months [to recover from].'” The $500,000 insurance policy won’t go far, according to Young, and the library has not yet received any FEMA reimbursement. It will, eventually, because FEMA now considers libraries essential community organizations and pays for the replacement of library books and publications. In the meantime, although many people want to drop off used novels, the library can only accept new ones. “We don’t want mold to come in,” she explains. “It could hurt the whole collection. You put a bunch of moldy books in there, and you can cross contaminate the air.”

Non – FEMA Zones

When it comes to getting FEMA money, not all libraries are created equal. Hurricane Sandy dumped more than eight inches of rain on Elyria, Ohio, shutting down the power in the main branch of the public library for more than 36 hours – which meant the sump pumps didn’t work. As a result, four inches of water accumulated in the basement and the elevator shaft there filled with eight feet of water. The old floor tile loosened and curled, requiring more than $10,000 worth of asbestos abatement. The total damage: $100,000. Though the books were unscathed, the library – not in the official FEMA disaster zone – needed to reduce new acquisitions for 2013 by 12 percent to pay for the losses. “That is where we had to pull the money for disaster recovery,” says library director Lyn Crouse. Simon & Schuster sent a mix of 500 children’s, YA, and adult books. (Eleven of the Queens libraries also received shipments from S&S.) “Some of the stories that I’ve gotten about the books lost in the school libraries – many because they were checked out and in homes that were destroyed – just moved me to tears,” says Michelle Fadlalla, director of education and library marketing for S&S. “We had a couple of public libraries say, ‘We’re not sure if you’ll consider us eligible, but now any money we had for 2013 to purchase materials is going to replace damaged equipment.'”

School and Bookstore Losses

At schools, book losses hit classrooms and afterschool programs as well as libraries. Hurricane Sandy flooded the basement and seeped into the Sheetrock walls of Frank Hankinson Elementary (P.S. 50) in Staten Island, N.Y., destroying the area that housed the preschool program and the mini – library – on – wheels for an afterschool program. “Ten days after the storm, the room started to smell a little funky,” says Sharon Fine, who retired in January 2013 as the principal. “We started to move furniture, and everything was green.” Hankinson Elementary threw out more than 1,000 books, in addition to toys and furniture. But in January the students returned to a plethora of new books provided through Literacy Lifeboats, an initiative aimed at helping teachers and students in schools hard hit by Hurricane Sandy. It started with the Teachers College (Columbia University) Reading and Writing Project, a youth – literacy program. The Project – “affiliated with a lot of literary giants,” as its reading specialist Cheryl Tyler notes – reached out to authors such as Tomie dePaola, who gave “hundreds and hundreds of books.” Other big – name donors include Jon Scieszka, Walter Dean Myers, and Jane Yolen. “We received donations from all over the world – Thailand, France, Sweden, Canada,” Tyler says. “We had books in the hands of kids within three weeks.”

The Our Learning Environment preschool in Island Park, N.Y., wound up under four-and-a-half feet of water and “lost everything,” including more than 1,000 books, says Danielle Urrego, co-owner, director, and teacher. Simon & Schuster sent 500 new picture books. “It was like Christmas morning here,” says Urrego. “We’re barely making ends meet. This saved the day.”

Booksellers suffered major losses as well. The tide came in so high that the Mystic River sent six inches of water into parts of Bank Square Books in Mystic, Conn. With the help of volunteers, co – owner Annie Philbrick moved somewhere between 10,000 and 15,000 kids’ books the day after the storm to an empty apartment upstairs from the shop, and temporarily packed 35,000 adult books into 400 crates and hauled them in two Mayflower moving vans to a storage facility two miles away. It took three weeks to dry out the walls and floors of the store and get it ready to reopen, with the help of books donated by Simon & Schuster, Penguin, Hachette, and Macmillan, among others. “People came in at Christmas and said, ‘Thank God, you’re back,'” says Philbrick. “We were grateful and appreciative of all the community support we received to help us get back up and running.” Like several other bookstores, River Road Books in Fair Haven, N.J. – four miles from the ocean and a block from a river – suffered from lost business more than from lost books. “It wasn’t your top priority to go shopping,” says co-owner Karen Rumage. S&S donated books to it and to six other bookstores hit by power outages and damage to the communities surrounding them.

But even with publishers, philanthropists, and book lovers giving generously, librarians are finding that some items are irreplaceable. Joan Walsh, director of the tiny Sea Bright Library in Monmouth County, N.J., notes that her collections included “a lot of treasures,” such as old postcards and original diplomas from the local elementary school. The library hasn’t reopened yet. Nor has the West End branch of the Long Beach, N.Y., library system, which discarded more than $95,000 worth of books, films, and DVDs – in other words, everything – after it filled with three feet of water. “For the construction industry, there’s a silver lining,” says George Trepp, director of the Long Beach Public Library. But for book lovers? He pauses. “Not so much.”

By: SIA March 20, 2013

5,000 lbs. of winter clothes at the warehouse in Denver, CO After SIA and Spyder put out the call in January for the New Year, New Start Sandy Relief Program, donations for victims of Hurricane Sandy poured into the SIA Warehouse in Denver. This week, about 5,000 pounds of product from nearly 70 snow sports companies and shops will arrive in New York where K.I.D.S. will distribute the donations to families in need. K.I.D.S. (Kids In Distressed Situations) is an organization that coordinates donations from companies and matches the products with the needs of specific families and situations. K.I.D.S. has been on the ground helping victims of Hurricane Sandy since the day the storm hit. “€œWe”€™re very excited that so many companies and shops have donated products,”€ said SIA President David Ingemie. “€œWe are sending a tractor trailer with 12 pallets of new warm clothing to K.I.D.S.”€ K.I.D.S. President Chris Blake said that as soon as the shipment arrives in New York, his organization will make an inventory and decide how best to distribute the products, focusing on a very quick turnaround. “€œWe want to extend a word of thanks to all the donors and to SIA and Spyder for coordinating this effort,”€ Blake said. “€œIn the four months since Hurricane Sandy, the relief effort has fallen off the radar screen but the need is still tremendous. K.I.D.S is still out there helping every day, and the donations from SIA will make a big difference.”€ Check out the list of all the donor companies and photos of the SIA/Spyder warehouse collection.

Source: Sia Snow Show

Valpolife WRITTEN BY DUNELAND SCHOOL CORPORATION LAST UPDATED ON 19 MARCH 2013

Brummitt Elementary School recently held a jar wars fundraiser to raise money for Scholastic’s All for Books. Scholastic matches the monetary donations schools generate with a donation of up to one million books to two national non-profit organizations dedicated to helping kids and families in need Kids in Distressed Situation, Inc. and the Kids In Need Foundation.

Students brought in spare change to vote for a staff member to dress up as a mad scientist. The winner was third grade teacher Jane Shuger. Mrs. Sugar invited her students to dress up for the festivities and they paraded through the classrooms encouraging the students to attend that evening’s VIP Night.

Front row, left to right, Peyton Day, Lauren Stephan, Ada Brandstetter, Michael Valadez, Ethan Kroft, Jacob Baigent, Elijah Calhoon and David Martino. Row 2, Yumna Nasar, Helen Jackson, Courtney Bartolini, Tyler Gallagher, Cameron Bates, Gage DeMarco, Matthew McCracken, Colby Bullock and Lily Moffatt. Back row, Kaleb Dilts, Luke Malave, Dustin Hawkins, teacher Jane Shuger, Jaismeen Kaur, Monika Ataman, Kylee Brunker and Kyle Quillin. (Duneland Schools photo)

media-130319-All-For-Books-jar-wars

Pop City TRACY CERTO | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013

media-130313-popcity

It’s blustery and bleak in Braddock with a light snow falling in windy swirls and not even a hint of sun. But people are lined up patiently and cheerfully outside The Free Store, a shipping container brightly painted in bold stripes on the exterior and inside, stuffed with gently used clothes of all kinds. They’re all free to whoever needs it.

The founder of The Free Store, who’s never worked in retail but on this day looks like she was born into it, is Gisele Baretto Fetterman, wife of the renowned Braddock mayor, John Fetterman.

While he gets most of the attention in the economically depressed Braddock, she’s a force in her own right –a slender and spirited 31 year-old beauty from Brazil who radiates warmth on this chilly day. She seems to know everyone there.

She knows the grandmas who are raising kids and what they need and she knows that Amber, who is coming by, is pregnant with a boy and so she has a stack of baby clothes neatly set aside for her.

She also knows that on average The Free Store has 50 to 70 people in an hour come through its single and narrow door, a number that would delight most retail stores. But then most days it’s only in operation for an hour and today, they seem to be here all at once.

Opened in October, 2012, The Free Store gets ample clothing donations from individuals but it’s the partnerships with companies, many through an organization called KIDS – Kids in Distressed Situations, out of New York–that energize Gisele.

“We got 400 velour jumpsuits from Juicy Couture because the tag was inside out,” she says proudly. And then there were the 250 Hello Kitty blankets she snagged simply because, “they failed to sew a nose on them and they would have gone to waste!” Not to mention the  recent 7 for Mankind shipment. “Look,” she says, holding up a chic and tiny pair of gray pants.

Now she’s working locally with Costco, getting their produce twice a week.

The shoppers, mostly women with a few men, politely jostle their way through the long and narrow and dimly lit container as they browse through double-tiered racks of clothes, many yelling a friendly greeting or stopping to hug her.

“She’s the best thing to happen to Braddock,” says  Dorothy Guy, grandmother of Jonathan, 14, who is helping out this day. “She’s so kind and everyone loves her.”

In response Gisele makes a disparaging noise that sounds a bit like a duck quacking—wah wah –as if to squash the remark. Dorothy goes on anyway and Giselle squawks softly again, pivoting sharply in her high heeled boots to direct attention to a pile of clothes in the front of the container.

She tells a story  of a little boy who saw a pile of Carter fleece pajamas and said, ‘I’ve always wanted one of these!’

“I cry three times a day here,” she says as she touches her hand to her heart.

While the store is open to “the community,” Giselle says, “I would never ID anyone or turn anyone away. We’ve become the first stop for several Allegheny County social workers who have families in need but the bulk of our customers are from Braddock, North braddock and Rankin.”

Most of the goods at The Free Store are clothing –due to space restrictions it’s challenging to store furniture or larger items–but they manage to bring in other things.  “We’re offering formula by request,” Gisele adds. A lot of women are altering formula to make it last longer, a bad idea. “I’m super pro breastfeeding,” she says.

Today she is eagerly awaiting the arrival of 25 desks from Construction Junction in partnership with a university.

When will they be here?” asks one woman who stands in the cold. “I have a dentist appointment at 2:00.”

“They said 1:15 so it should be any time now,” Giselle assures her. The woman exhales in relief.

It is easy to imagine Gisele elsewhere:  on a runway, for instance, with her model looks and figure or at a swank party, drink in hand, bobbing to the music. But in this setting all cylinders seem to be firing as she holds court, summoned constantly for help.

“Do you have hangers?” asks a woman inside the container. “I have so many hangers!” Giselle says with a bright laugh and then points the way.

It started with a letter 
When the conversation turns to her husband and how unexpectedly funny he was during a TEDxGrandview Ave presentation in Pittsburgh, she nods. “He’s very self-deprecating,” she says.

Giselle has been married to John Fetterman for 5 years, having met him after reading about Braddock in a national news story while she was at a yoga retreat and living in New Jersey.

“Braddock felt so sad,” she says. “So I wrote a letter to the bureau and offered to start a summer program for kids. John called and invited me to meet with him — and it was love!” she says laughing. “Isn’t that romantic?”

On sight, they are an oddly incongruous pair. He’s hulking and intimidating with his Braddock zip code tattoo emblazoned on his forearms and his don’t-mess-with-me demeanor; she’s slight, elegant and more approachable, with a ready smile.

A holistic nutritionist and a graduate of Columbia University, Gisele is now the mother of two children with John, a four year old son and an 18 month old daughter. They also have a rescue dog from Hello Bully named Kale, after the vegetable.

“The four year old will now say, ‘I don’t wear that anymore. Take it to the Free Store,'” says Giselle, smiling.

At home they have two containers like this one, she says of the Free Store structure, which they got from a company in Swissvale. The container is both store and storage: in the front, donated clothes are piled waist high in plastic and cloth bags.

And while at first this might seem an unlikely setting for her, her background proves otherwise.

She moved from the beautiful but dangerous part of Rio de Janeiro to New York with her mom (now a N. Braddock resident), grandmother and brother, Del.  “The violence was just too much,” she says. “My mother wanted us to have opportunities beyond what Brazil was able to offer back in the early 90s when we emigrated.”

In New York, the 9-year old Giselle would explore on bulk garbage days, finding  items such as furniture in perfect condition. “I would always try to find a new home for things,” she says. “Our entire first apartment was furnished with roadside finds–“bulk garbage day” as they called it in New York.”

And for her wedding with John, she wore a gown that she bought in a thrift shop for $13.

Gisele is excited about finding a home for another project, this one with Free Ride of Pittsburgh to start a Braddock Red Lantern Bike Shop in a container next to The Free Shop.

“Brian is here!” she says, eager to make the connection as she calls to Brian Sink, the founder who awaits outside.

The bike shop will be similar to Free Ride Pittsburgh, he says, where they will  fix bikes for kids and others in a DIY effort and will have used and recycled bikes available to buy for only $5 or $10 dollars. “You volunteer to pay them off, ” he says.  Everyone gets the same volunteer rate of $8, whether it’s a six-year old child or me, he explains.

Within two months, says Giselle, the container will be in place and the Red Lantern Bike Shop will open. Soon they’ll get a much-needed drop off box, too, she adds excitedly.

It’s not the only change coming to Braddock St.  Another project she’s undertaking is something she calls Positively Parking to counter all the negative parking messaging on the main street. Soon she hopes to have signs up and down Braddock St. proclaiming everything from “NOTICE: EAT MORE VEGETABLES to  NOTICE: LOVE ONE ANOTHER.

Inspirational signs dot the landscape of the Free Sign, including this one upon entering: Be kind for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.

In a happy ending, the desks arrived  as scheduled and so did 100 veggie platters from Costco on the next day.  Gisele posted on Facebook – first trip is to the senior citizens center to drop off veggies and then the rest would be at the Free Store. Also, 10 desks are available outside the store to anyone in need!

“Braddock,” she says, gesturing with arms wide as if to encompass it all, “is a 24 hour gig.”  She has taken it on along with her husband.  And somehow you can’t imagine her anywhere else.

Photographs copyright Tracy Certo

Gifts and Decorative Accessories GDA Staff — Gifts & Dec, February 5, 2013

Furniture and gear source Delta Children and the nonprofit charity Kids in Distressed Situations plan to donate 200 cribs to families this week while launching its national Safe Sleep campaign.

The campaign is designed to educate parents and other caregivers of young children about safe sleeping conditions and provide new cribs that meet current safety standards. On Thursday, Feb. 7, 200 cribs, valued at $60,000, will be donated to the charity Baby Buggy at its Children’s Institute site in Los Angeles. A Safe Sleep demonstration will also take place. K.I.D.S., on behalf of Delta and Baby Buggy, will distribute the cribs to needy families in the Los Angeles area.

“Delta Children was founded by my father, Louis Shamie. We are carrying on the tradition started by him to give and to give generously,” said Joseph Shamie, co-president of Delta. “These cribs will help less fortunate parents provide safe environments, while educating them on the importance of safe sleep.”

Chris Blake, interim president of K.I.D.S, said working with Delta to create the Safe Sleep campaign has been exciting.

“More than giving safe products, this program will help create safe environments and instill safe habits,” Blake said. “For our Los Angeles event, we have the utmost confidence in Baby Buggy to get these cribs to the families that need them most.”

Baby Buggy, founded by Jessica Seinfeld, helps provide essential products, clothing and educational services to needy families.

“The safety and comfort of a reliable crib is extremely important to any parent with young children,” Seinfeld said. “Delta’s donation will help reassure thousands of parents in our network that their children are sleeping in the safest environment they can provide.”

UT San Diego By Linda McIntosh  JAN. 28, 2013

CAMP PENDLETON — Camp Pendleton was the first stop on a Disney tour bringing Hollywood celebrities and books to children at bases across the country as part of Blue Star Families’ Books on Bases program.

Disney star Adam Irigoyen of the show “Shake it Up” came on base Saturday and read a book to nearly 200 children and their Marine families in the Semper Fit Paige Fieldhouse.

Irigoyen took turns reading with base commanding general, Brig. Gen. Vincent A. Coglianese. The star and the general held the microphone for each other during the afternoon event, which included autographs by Irigoyen and free books for families to take home.

The nonprofit Blue Star Families donated 4,000 books to the base’s libraries and child development centers. Over the coming year, Disney is slated to distibute 30,000 books to military children nationwide through the program that supports literacy.

Since Blue Star Families started the program in 2009 with Kids in Distressed Situations aka KIDS at an event near Fort Bragg, NC, the group has brought books to more than 100,000 children of service members.

For more information about the program, go to bluestarfam.org.

Newsday By LAUREN R. HARRISON January 8, 2013 8:37 PM

More than 30 Long Island schools and libraries that were hard-hit by superstorm Sandy are slated to receive books donated by Scholastic, the children’s publishing, education and media company.

The effort is part of a larger initiative by Scholastic to donate a million books to schools impacted by Sandy in New YorkNew Jersey and Connecticut. School officials began picking up books on Monday at sites operated by Kids in Distressed Situations Inc. — a nonprofit that helps children scarred by poverty and tragedy.

“There’s just been tremendous need for new books, so teachers have the resources that they need and students can continue learning,” said Greg Worrell, president of Scholastic’s classroom and community group division, in a phone interview.


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So far, about 500,000 books have been committed to more than 100 schools in the tri-state area, Worrell said. Schools can still apply via Scholastic’s website, scholastic.com/bookgrants.

“We’re very appreciative to Scholastic for their generosity,” said Robert Fenter, assistant superintendent for curriculum, instruction and research at Oceanside schools. “Three of our libraries were impacted by the storm. We had water damage. . . . each of the libraries lost books.”

Fenter said he expects to receive 6,000 books each for South Oceanside Road Elementary School and Boardman Elementary School, and 10,000 books for Fulton Avenue School.

Harding Avenue Elementary School in Lindenhurst expects about 500 books, said its principal, Brian Chamberlin. “We have 116 families that are displaced from their homes . . . which is about a third of our population,” Chamberlin said. The book donation will help to “replenish the books that the children lost in their houses.”

Reading can also build resilience and grit to get through difficult times, said Worrell, adding,”You can find a message or a positive word or a moment in a book that can give you just what you need to get you over that hurdle.”

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers Media Placements

APP.com Written by Gina Columbus | @ginacolumbusapp

TOMS RIVER — People were busily shopping through the aisles, picking out colors and sizes and stacking them in paper bags. But their eyes were lit up. They wore smiles of relief.

Because they were at First United Methodist Church in Toms River, where a multi-organizational effort between
Ocean County Hunger Relief, Toms River Rotary Club and Fashion Delivers set up a “pop-up store” of clothing,
accessories, shoes and more for superstorm Sandy victims.

The distribution event, which ran from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., provided truckloads of brand-new necessities — from
pajamas, to hats and gloves, to sunglasses, to linens — for storm victims to take. Tables neatly lined with goodies
made aisles for people, bringing some post-holiday cheer.

Frank and Daria Huber of Brick were one of many Sandy victims shopping through First United Methodist Church
on Saturday. Sandy flooded their crawl space and also damaged their roof, causing water leaks in their attic. They
have buckets sprawled throughout the attic, and the couple constantly go up and empty the containers.
So Daria Huber, 50, called Saturday’s distribution a blessing.

“Like the pressure’s off,” said Daria Huber. “There are so many other things that we have to use our money for,
when you have a resource like this, it just lightens the load a little bit. We lost our cars, we lost a number of things
and it’s just, you have to put money aside for that.. so then you don’t have a lot extra for these kinds of things.”
Ocean County Hunger Relief provided their warehouse to hold the $250,000 worth of items, while First United
Methodist Church lent their banquet hall space for Saturday’s event. The Rotary Club sought donations, while
Fashion Delivers provided them.

Ocean County Hunger Relief, a nonprofit organization formed in 1981, provides emergency food assistance to
county residents and operates 35 food pantries throughout Ocean County.

Following Sandy, the Toms River Rotary Club also wanted to help. John Mosko, chairman of the club’s Disaster
Relief Committee, said their Sandy-relief efforts really energized the committee, since the disaster was so close to
home. The club reached out to local charities they work with every year, including Ocean County Hunger Relief.
He found Fashion Delivers, who asked manufacturers to donate brand new apparel.

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers Press Releases

March 9, 2017 — K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, the charity of choice for new product donations made by hundreds of companies in the fashion, home, and children’s industries, will honor three outstanding leaders at its 11th Annual Women of Inspiration Luncheon fundraiser Wednesday, June 7, 2017, at The Pierre Hotel in New York City. The luncheon honorees are Gaye Dean, Marketing Director for Licensing at Target; Lana Todorovich, President, Women’s Apparel and Accessories – Wholesale at Ralph Lauren; and Tracy Reese, Fashion Designer.

 

“Our luncheon has become a shining example of what is possible when committed men and women come together for a worthy cause,” said Luncheon Co-Chair Karen Bromley. “The honorees’ professional accomplishments are matched by their commitment to philanthropy and helping others in need. The women being honored harness their power to give back, and inspire others to do the same.”

 

Luncheon tables start at $7,500 and individual tickets will also be available at $300. For additional information please contact Lauren Barnett at Lauren@DonateProduct.comor via phone at 212-279-5343. To purchase tickets or tables for the luncheon, visit bit.ly/2017Luncheon.

 

“The K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers Women of Inspiration Luncheon is an amazing celebration of women, as well as a way to focus on how we support individuals in need through the gift of new product,” said Luncheon Co-Chair Carole Postal. “We come together to acknowledge the honorees’ professional endeavors, and to recognize the impact that new and useful product can make in the lives of millions of people in need each year.” For more information about the luncheon, please visit www.kidsfdluncheon.com

 

Founded over 30 years ago, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that unites retailers, manufacturers, foundations and individuals to support people affected by poverty and tragedy. Donating new merchandise provides companies with a simple and effective way to help people in need. K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is an extremely efficient charity, with more than 97% of revenue dedicated to its charitable program of distributing apparel, accessories, shoes, home furnishings, toys, books and other useful items. Since 1985, over $1.4 billion of donated products have been distributed through our network of community partners, serving the poor and disadvantaged worldwide.

New York, October 6, 2016 – K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers and the American Apparel & Footwear Association have teamed up to supply one million pairs of socks to the nation’s homeless and poor in honor of World Homeless Day, which will be observed on October 10. The socks will be distributed at shelters throughout the country for individuals without a home or access to clean, new clothing. Donations will begin on October 10 and continue throughout the following 12 months.

To date, the companies DSW Inc., GBG Socks, LLC/Planet Sox, Gold Medal International, No nonsense, Renfro Corporation, TTI Global Resources, and United Legwear & Apparel Co., among others, have combined to commit over 500,000 pairs of socks to people in need. AAFA and K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers continue to seek donations from additional companies to reach the goal of one million pairs of socks. Any company that is interested in donating new socks for this campaign, or needs further information, may email Merrie Keller at merrie@donateproduct.com or call 212-279-5325.

The National Alliance to End Homelessness reports that in 2015, more than half a million Americans were identified as homeless – 63 percent of that total were individuals and 37 percent were people in families. According to agencies that support homeless and the needy, socks and underwear are among the most requested, non-consumable items because they must be purchased brand new, unlike coats that are regularly donated secondhand.

Recognizing the ability for the legwear industry to make a significant impact by collectively donating overstock and samples, Isaac E. Ash, President and CEO of United Legwear & Apparel Co. challenged industry colleagues to donate more than what they might normally allocate for charities. At a recent AAFA Legwear Committee meeting, Mr. Ash challenged his colleagues to join forces and reach a goal of one million pairs of socks. “We all have so much to give, and pooling resources will get more product to people,” said Ash. “It can also call attention to these often-forgotten populations as weather becomes colder.”

“AAFA is always enthusiastic to take on a unique opportunity,” said Rick Helfenbein, president and CEO of AAFA. “When our legwear members challenged us to help raise one million pairs of socks for the homeless, the stakes were high but the potential impact even greater. Thinking that a warm pair of socks can make a difference with every person that we touch, AAFA is working hard to help make this program a huge success.”

-more-

266 West 37th Street 22nd Floor New York, NY 10018 212-279-5493 DonateProduct.com

“Over the next few months, we will be distributing the socks as they are donated, supporting many communities nationwide in their efforts to help homeless and poverty-stricken people,” said K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers President & CEO, Lisa Gurwitch. “In addition, donor companies will engage employees to visit local agencies and personally give socks to the people in need.”

Initial distributions are being planned for New York; Washington, DC; Chicago; Los Angeles; Houston; and North Carolina. More information about the campaign and updates on its progress will be online at www.OneMillionPairs.org. Individuals and groups can show their support on social media using #OneMillionPairs.

About AAFA: Representing more than 1,000 world famous name brands, the American Apparel &

Footwear Association (AAFA) is the trusted public policy and political voice of the apparel and footwear industry, its management and shareholders, its four million U.S. workers, and its contribution of $361 billion in annual U.S. retail sales. AAFA stands at the forefront as a leader of positive change for the apparel and footwear industry. With integrity and purpose, AAFA delivers a unified voice on key legislative and regulatory issues. AAFA enables a collaborative forum to promote

best practices and innovation. AAFA’s comprehensive work ensures the continued success and growth of the apparel and footwear industry, its suppliers, and its customers.

About KI.D.S./Fashion Delivers: K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc. is the charity of choice for new product donations made by hundreds of companies in the fashion, home and children’s industries. Donating new merchandise provides these companies with a simple and effective way to help people in need. Founded over 30 years ago, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is a 501 (c (3) nonprofit organization that unites retailers, manufacturers, foundations and individuals to support people affected by poverty and tragedy. Since 1985, over $1.4 billion of donated products have been distributed through our network of community partners, serving the poor and disadvantaged worldwide. For more information, please visit www.DonateProduct.com.

Media Contacts:

Shakiera Walker, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, shakiera@donateproduct.com, ph. 646-362-9090 Alexander Gibson, AAFA, agibson@aafaglobal.org, ph. 202-853-9356

SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 (New York, NY) – Last month, prolonged rainfall in southern parts of Louisiana resulted in catastrophic flooding that submerged thousands of houses and businesses. The state of Louisiana continues to deal with a significant level of flooding and one of the worst natural disasters in recent years. K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers has partnered with State Representative Edward “Ted” James and the Urban League of Louisiana to help individuals and families who have been affected by this devastating disaster.  • The flooding, (both in the city of Baton Rouge, and throughout the state of Louisiana), has left thousands of people and families displaced and in need of essential items to rebuild their lives during the upcoming months. • New product donated by the fashion, home and children’s industries will go far in helping people in need as we enter the winter months ahead. • Individuals and families affected by the flooding can use men’s, women’s and children apparel. Towels, sheets, blankets, comforters, pillows, toys and home items are also greatly needed. Thank you to the product donors who have already donated to help K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers make a difference in the lives of those affected by this disaster. To date we have been able to collect over $2 million of product to help those in need. Some of the key donors include: • •

Some of the key donors include: • • aden + anais • Burlington Stores • BOBS from Skechers • Children’s Apparel Network • EP Pro • Free People • Gerber Childrenswear • Haddad Brands • Hanes Brands • Jade Jeans • Kolcraft • LF Sourcing • Reunited Clothing  • Rifle Kaynee Uniform If you have any of the necessary products, or know a company that does, please contact Carla Fattal at Carla@donateproduct.com or 646-362-9088. For our product donation form, please click below:   http://bit.ly/KIDSFDproductdonation

To donate money to help transport the product please click below:   http://bit.ly/KIDSFDcashdonation

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc. is the charity of choice for new product donations made by hundreds of companies in the fashion, home and children’s industries. Donating new merchandise provides these companies with a simple and effective way to help people in need. Founded over 30 years ago, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that unites retailers, manufacturers,

If you have any of the necessary products, or know a company that does, please contact Carla Fattal at Carla@donateproduct.com or 646-362-9088. For our product donation form, please click below:   http://bit.ly/KIDSFDproductdonation To donate money to help transport the product please click below:   http://bit.ly/KIDSFDcashdonation K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc. is the charity of choice for new product donations made by hundreds of companies in the fashion, home and children’s industries. Donating new merchandise provides these companies with a simple and effective way to help people in need. Founded over 30 years ago, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that unites retailers, manufacturers, foundations and individuals to support people affected by poverty and tragedy. Since 1985, over $1.4 billion of donated products have been distributed through our network of community partners worldwide. For more information, please visit www.DonateProduct.com.   About Urban League of Greater New Orleans:  Established in 1938, the mission of the Urban League is to enable African-Americans and other communities seeking equity to secure economic self-reliance, parity and civil rights.  Programs of the Urban League’s three Centers of Excellence are focused in the areas of education and youth development, workforce and economic development and public policy and advocacy. For more information on the Urban League, visit us online at www.urbanleagueneworleans.org and/or follow us on Facebook and Twitter (@ULGNO).

 

Media Contacts: Peter Paris, Marketing Director, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers Phone: 646.362.9091 Email:Peter@DonateProduct.com  Cathy Washington, Executive Vice President, Urban League of Louisiana Phone: 504.416.0221 Email: cwashington@urbanleagueneworleans.org .

August 29, 2016 (New York, NY) — K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, the charity of choice for new product donations made by companies in the fashion, home and children’s industries, will honor two industry leaders at its annual gala fundraiser Wednesday, November 9, 2016, at the prestigious American Museum of Natural History in New York City. This year, the charity’s annual gala recognizes the support of Richard Barry, Executive Vice President, Global Chief Merchandising Officer at Toys“R”Us, Inc. and Marc Heller, President of CIT Commercial Services and K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers Executive Board Member. The honorees’ commitment to K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers over the years has impacted millions of children, families and individuals in need, both nationally and internationally. In addition to the two honorees, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is also recognizing three top product donors, highlighting their contributions to the organization and how they have helped improve the lives of millions of people in need every year. Together, Global Brands Group, PVH Corp., and Skechers USA have given K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers over $113 million in useful, new product. “Every year, it is an honor to come together to support K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers with leaders in the fashion, home, and children’s industries,” said Gala Co-Chairman Rick Darling of Li & Fung Trading, Inc. “K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers makes a profound impact in the lives of those challenged by poverty and natural disasters.” “The K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers gala is an amazing celebration that helps support people in need.” said Gala Co-Chairman Howard Kahn of Kahn Lucas. “This year, we have the pleasure of also honoring top product donors who provide new product for people challenged by poverty, who would otherwise have to make hard choices between food, housing or new clothes.” hope, dignity and self-esteem to people in need. Gala tables start at $15,000, and a limited number of individual tickets will be available at $1,500. There are also several special opportunities for corporate or brand sponsorship at the gala; for additional information please contact Lauren Barnett at Lauren@DonateProduct.com or via phone at 212-279-5343 To learn more about the gala, visit www.KIDSFDGALA.com. This year’s gala highlights the theme of #DeliveringGood, and the need for new product is immensely important – today one out of every six Americans face poverty. Throughout the year, our product donors help us provide  K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc. is the charity of choice for new product donations made by hundreds of companies in the fashion, home and children’s industries. Donating new merchandise provides these companies with a simple and effective way to help people in need. Founded over 30 years ago, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that unites retailers, manufacturers, foundations and individuals to support people affected by poverty and tragedy. K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is an extremely efficient charity, with more than 97% of revenue dedicated to its charitable program of distributing apparel, accessories, shoes, home furnishings, toys, books and other useful items. Since 1985, over $1.4 billion of donated products have been distributed through our network of community partners, serving the poor and disadvantaged worldwide. For more information, please visit www.DonateProduct.com.

### 

Media Contact: Shakiera Walker, Digital Marketing Manager, K.I.D.S./Fashion Deliver. Phone: 646.362.9090 Email: Shakiera@DonateProduct.com

August 11, 2016 (New York, NY) — K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, the charity of choice for new product donations made by companies in the fashion, home and children’s industries, welcomes Merrie Keller as its new Director of Product Procurement as of June 27, 2016. Keller joins K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers with over twenty years of experience as a business development and brand management professional, and extensive knowledge of the fashion and home product industries.

“Merrie will bring leadership and creativity to the work of K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, as well as a deep sense of commitment to helping children, adults and families in need,” says K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers President & CEO Lisa Gurwitch. “She has served companies at a variety of executive and leadership roles related to product development, and brings additional perspective and experience to the organization. The need for donations of useful, new product is enormous – today, one out of every six Americans faces poverty. Merrie will help us fill the gap faced by people in need.”

“I am thrilled to be with an organization that makes such a profound impact in the lives of so many people,” said Keller. “K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers gives me an opportunity to use my product experience for those that simply need a helping hand. I see it not just as a job, but also as a privilege to work with a team of passionate and committed professionals and industry leaders.”

Keller’s career has included the development of strategic brand partnerships, licensing agreements, designer collaborations and retail partnership initiatives, at notable companies like The Beanstalk Group, Matchbook Company, and Perpetual Licensing. As the Director of Product Procurement, her goals are to oversee and expand product donor relations, so that K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers can exceed its goal of $155 million of new apparel, toys, books, home items and other merchandise in 2016. By providing only new product, the people in need also receive the gift of both hope and dignity.

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc. is the charity of choice for new product donations made by hundreds of companies in the fashion, home and children’s industries. Donating new merchandise provides these companies with a simple and effective way to help people in need. Founded over 30 years ago, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that unites retailers, manufacturers, foundations and individuals to support people affected by poverty and tragedy. K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is an extremely efficient charity, with more than 97% of revenue dedicated to its charitable program of distributing apparel, accessories, shoes, home furnishings, toys, books and other useful items. Since 1985, over $1.4 billion of donated products have been distributed through our network of community partners, serving the poor and disadvantaged worldwide. For more information, please visit www.DonateProduct.com.

***MEDIA ADVISORY***

Reno Rodeo Foundation Skechers Distribution Event
29,000 Pairs to Children in Need

RENO, Nev. (TBD) – The Reno Rodeo Foundation received a generous donation through a formal partnership with K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers. Skechers has donated 29,000 pairs of “Bobs” donation shoes that will be distributed to children residing throughout 14 northern Nevada counties. The Reno Rodeo Foundation and partners, including local Skechers employees, will host a distribution event at the Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center Exhibit Hall April 2, where children will receive a new pair of BOBS and have the opportunity to personalize them at hosted decorating stations.

WHEN: Saturday, April 2 at 10 a.m.

WHERE: Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center Exhibit Hall, 1350 N Wells Ave.

WHO: The Reno Rodeo Foundation in collaboration with Washoe County Social Services, Washoe County School District, Education Alliance of Washoe County, Washoe County Child Protective Services and the State of Nevada Division of Child & Family Services, as well as organizations like the Children’s Cabinet, Boys & Girls Club, Catholic Charities and Good Shepherd’s Clothes Closet will help distribute these new shoes to children in 14 northern Nevada counties.

Skechers executives and employees will also be flying into Reno to attend this event to help with the distribution event.

Since the BOBS from SKECHERS program launched in 2011, SKECHERS has donated more than 13 million pairs of new shoes to children in need. SKECHERS partners with Head Start programs, education foundations, homeless shelters, disaster relief, and 501(c)(3) organizations to assist children and families in communities across the United States and around the world.

In addition to the Skechers team, President and CEO of K.I.D.S./ Fashion Delivers charitable organization Lisa Gurwitch will be attending the Reno Rodeo distribution event to represent the organization.

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc. is the charity of choice for new product donations made by hundreds of companies in the fashion, home and children’s industries. Donating new merchandise provides these companies with a simple and effective way to help people in need. Founded 31 years ago, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that unites retailers, manufacturers, foundations and individuals to support people affected by poverty and tragedy. For more information, please visit http://www.DonateProduct.com.

WHY: Formed in 1986, the Reno Rodeo Foundation has been making a difference to children and families in northern Nevada for more than 25 years. Started as a private foundation with the sole purpose of distributing the proceeds from the annual Reno Rodeo through scholarships and community grants, the Reno Rodeo Foundation is Nevada based a 501(c)(3) public charity offering a much broader range of support to those in need in our community. The mission of the Reno Rodeo Foundation is to enhance and enrich the lives of northern Nevada families by aiding children with extraordinary needs, building community partnerships, and providing scholarships to eligible northern Nevada high-school graduates to attend a Nevada College or University.

March 29,2016 (NY, New York) –K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, the charity of choice for new product donations made by companies in the fashion, home and children’s industries, welcomes Ludovic Leroy II as its new Director of Development as of today, March 2016. Leroy joins K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers with over fifteen years of experience as a development professional, with an extensive background in campaign planning and management, as well as trustee and donor relations. For the last two years he has held the position of Executive Director, Strategic Partnerships and Institutional Support at the esteemed Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York.

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers President and CEO Lisa Gurwitch says, “Ludovic brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to K.I.D.S./ Fashion Delivers, and we are incredibly fortunate to have him as part of our team. His talent will help us establish long lasting, innovative partnerships with our supporters so that we can continue to help children, adults and families in need.”

I am thrilled to join the K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers team,” said Ludovic Leroy. “The organization has had a tremendous impact in helping to foster hope and dignity among people in need and I am looking forward to helping build and strengthen relationships that support its efforts.”

Leroy’s fundraising career includes notable successes during his tenure at Pratt, overseeing fundraising from corporations, foundations and government agencies. Leroy’s fundraising career includes notable successes during his tenure at Pratt, overseeing fundraising from corporations, foundations and government agencies. He developed a corporate engagement program that realized a 130% increase in support over two years. Leroy brings a passion for the creative process within fundraising and an interest in emerging philanthropic trends. He holds a BA from the City College, City University of New York.

K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc. is the charity of choice for new product donations made by hundreds of companies in the fashion, home and children’s industries. Donating new merchandise provides these companies with a simple and effective way to help people in need. Founded 31 years ago, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that unites retailers, manufacturers, foundations and individuals to support people affected by poverty and tragedy. K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is an extremely efficient charity, with more than 97% of revenue dedicated to its charitable program of distributing apparel, accessories, shoes, home furnishings, toys, books and other useful items. Since 1985, over $1.3 billion of donated products have been distributed through our network of community partners, serving the poor and disadvantaged worldwide. For more information, please visit www.DonateProduct.com.
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Media Contact:
Shakiera Walker, K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers, Inc.
646 362 9090, shakiera@donateproduct.com

MEDIA ALERT: K.I.D.S./ Fashion Delivers To Honor Three Women of Inspiration at June 7th Luncheon

What: K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is holding its 10th annual Women of Inspiration luncheon to help support the charity’s mission, working to assist families and individuals in need or affected by disaster. K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers provides new products – including apparel, accessories, shoes, home furnishings and other necessities – to assist with economic hardships.

Who: Honorees include:
• Louise Camuto, Chief Creative Officer, Camuto Group,
• Claudia Stern, Intimate Buyer, Gabriel Brothers,
• Luanne Whiting-Lager, VP/CFO, Regal Lager, Inc.

When: The Tenth Annual Women of Inspiration Luncheon will be June 7, 2016. Red Carpet & Reception start at 11:30 A.M. Awards and Luncheon will be held 12:00-2:00 pm.

Where: The Pierre, 2 E 61st St, New York City, 10065,

Tickets must be purchased in advance. Individual ticket sales start at $275 and Sponsorships start at $7,500. K.I.D.S./Fashion Delivers is celebrating 31 years of helping people in need and distributions of more than $1.3 billion of donated new product.

Media Contact:
Shakiera Walker
Digital Marketing Manager
K.I.D.S| Fashion Delivers
Phone: 646. 362.9090
Shakiera@DonateProduct.com
Website:kidsfdluncheon.com